This Issue

2017 January-February

Partnership Is the New Leadership

[vc_row][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="23482" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width="1/4"][vc_single_image image="23488" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] Mahesh Ramanujam President and CEO USGBC & GBCI [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="3/4"][vc_column_text] [dropcaps type='normal' color='' background_color='' border_color='']E[/dropcaps]very single day, I wake up invigorated by the spirit and strength of the work being done by every member of the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) and the larger green building community around the world that believes in and supports our mission. In my new role as president and CEO of USGBC and Green Business Certification Inc. (GBCI), I’ve pledged to all of you to further enhance our organizational capabilities; bring more people into our global movement; widen our sphere of influence; and to innovate beyond our wildest dreams. USGBC is committed to investing in the future by developing the full potential of the diverse, committed, and passionate people who power our movement. Only by aspiring to organizational excellence and optimum efficiency across our movement will we be able to solve the challenges of tomorrow, writing a new story about people and their stewardship of the built and natural environment. One of the best ways to achieve our lofty goals is to partner with other like-minded individuals, organizations, governments, and businesses to...

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All the Difference

[vc_row][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="18094" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_single_image image="23491" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] By Kiley Jacques [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] Lava Mae addresses a chronic challenge facing homeless populations. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="20"][vc_column_text] With its mission to “take radical hospitality to the street,” Lava Mae gives people experiencing homelessness access to shower facilities—by making them mobile. Founded in San Francisco in 2014, Lava Mae converts retired city buses into hygiene facilities to deliver showers and “rekindle dignity.” “Homelessness is something that had been on my radar for a while,” says Doniece Sandoval, Lava Mae’s founder and chief executive officer. “It’s an incredibly visible issue in this city.” Sandoval describes her own neighborhood’s gentrification, recalling elderly neighbors who ended up first living in their cars after being evicted, then on the streets—“gentlemen in their 80s, so unprepared for that kind of life. No one is prepared for [that].” She watched as they suffered their circumstances, and she tried, impossibly, to explain their situation to her then-five-year-old daughter. That marked the start of what would become her true life’s work. [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="23493" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_column_text]Doniece Sandoval, Lava Mae’s founder and chief executive officer, with regional director Paul Asplund. Photo: Emily Hagopian[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center"...

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Site Specific Solar

[vc_row][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="16705" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_single_image image="23509" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] By Kiley Jacques [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] Diverse organizations come together to make Yellowstone the nation’s greenest park. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="20"][vc_column_text] Something savvy is happening on the Lamar Buffalo Ranch in Yellowstone National Park—something solar savvy. The coming together of Toyota, Indy Power Systems, Sharp USA, SolarWorld, Patriot Solar, the National Park Service, and Yellowstone Park Foundation has resulted in a first-of-its-kind energy system that repurposes used hybrid car battery packs to store solar power. The stand-alone microgrid provides reliable, sustainable, zero-emission power to the park’s ranger station and education center. [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="23524" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_column_text]Yellowstone’s Strategic Plan for Sustainability sets forth goals for operational and infrastructure improvements that reduce impacts on the environment while enhancing visitor experiences and employee living and working conditions.[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" padding_bottom="25" padding_top="20"][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_column_text]Toyota, a U.S. Green Building Council Platinum level member, was a driving force for the project. The company has enjoyed a long-standing working relationship with the National Park Service and the Yellowstone Park Foundation. For many years, Toyota has supplied hybrid vehicles to support park operations, and has shared green building expertise and...

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Sustainable Equality

[vc_row][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="17498" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_single_image image="23529" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] By Alexandra Deluca [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] Green For All gives disenfranchised communities a voice in sustainability. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="20"][vc_column_text] Like a rising tide that lifts all boats, a truly green economy should be all encompassing, and one Oakland, California, organization has committed to this goal by working at the delta of communities, pollution, and sustainability. [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="23540" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_column_text]Vien Truong leads Green For All, a national initiative to build an inclusive green economy strong enough to lift people out of poverty.[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" padding_bottom="25"][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_column_text]“Our mission is to create an inclusive green economy strong enough to lift people out of poverty,” says Vien Truong, director of the nongovernmental organization Green For All. “We work on solutions at the federal, state, and local levels. A lot of work that we do is not only on policy but it’s also on politics and really engaging people.” “We want to make sure that we’re doing it in ways that are really inclusive of people who are at the bottom tiers and really making sure they’re engaged in the change of the community. By...

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Making the Case

[vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" padding_bottom="15"][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_column_text] Making the Case [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] A new software program helps users see the holistic value of sustainable design.   By Jeff Harder[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text]To John Williams, it’s simple: Convincing investors, owners, and other stakeholders that green buildings are worthwhile propositions means going beyond high-minded virtues and instead, letting the dollars do the talking. “I’m a pragmatist,” says Williams, chairman, CEO, and co-founder of software developer Impact Infrastructure, a Silver level member of the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). “I believe in doing things that are good for the environment and in making more resilient cities and buildings, but I know from a practical point of view that I won’t achieve those goals without showing people what’s in it for them in an objective way.” Objectivity is the organizing principle behind Autocase for Sustainable Buildings, a platform developed by Impact Infrastructure and Bay Area software developer Autodesk, a Platinum level member of USGBC. Unveiled last October at Greenbuild 2016 in Los Angeles, Autocase for Sustainable Buildings is a little like Turbo Tax for green building: an affordable, browser-based platform (complete with a ticker updated in real time) that harnesses mountains of peer-reviewed studies and empirical metrics, automates and simplifies...

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Neutral Zone

[vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" padding_bottom="15"][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_column_text] Neutral Zone [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] An initiative created by the AIA helps architectural firms turn the 2030 Challenge into a 2030 Commitment.   By Alexandra DeLuca[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text]“I am such a believer that the hardest line to draw on a canvas is that first one,” says Greg Mella, an architect at SmithGroup JJR and co-chair of the American Institute of Architects (AIA) 2030 Commitment Steering Committee, which was formed in response to the challenge in 2006 by architect Edward Mazria for all buildings to be carbon neutral by 2030. Since 2009, nearly 400 firms have taken that initial step, tracking and reporting their entire portfolios—representing more than 2.6 billion square feet of project work in 2015—thanks to a national standardized framework developed by Mella and AIA to help measure the progress toward a carbon-neutral built environment. “Our members really drove this,” says Melissa Wackerle, director of Sustainable Practice & Knowledge at AIA. “The creation of this initiative makes adopting the 2030 Challenge into a 2030 Commitment. It’s a commitment to design to those goals and measure progress.” AIA collects data that includes the type of building, area, baseline energy performance, and predicted energy performance. “The program grows every year, so we’ve...

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Moira Moser

[vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" padding_top="50"][vc_column width="1/3"][vc_single_image image="23580" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="20"][vc_single_image image="23817" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_column_text css=".vc_custom_1486497915387{margin-top: 20px !important;}"]With 15 locations worldwide, Moser’s firm has certified more than 4.7 million square feet of space in the last eight years, spanning 20 international cities. That success has played a central role in expanding green design across Asia, and it is rooted in an unconventional approach to creating sustainable workplaces. Moser begins each project by addressing the needs of workers and business owners, customizing designs to foster healthy, green, productive workplaces. In our conversation, Moser shares her thoughts on that process, on a changing industry and workplace, and on the immense challenge of global warming.[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="20"][/vc_column][vc_column width="2/3"][vc_column_text]USGBC+: Your firm recently completed its 100th LEED-certified project in China. What does that accomplishment mean for M Moser Associates and for energy-efficient design around the world? MM: It’s a really important milestone. It means a great deal to our staff that when we do this globally and collaboratively, we can achieve something remarkable. In terms of global sustainability, I think what is happening is that [LEED certification] and sustainability have become a basis for good design. In other words, if you don’t have sustainability in...

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