This Issue

2017 July-August

Unique Leadership Platforms

[vc_row][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="24595" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width="1/4"][vc_single_image image="24593" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] Taryn Holowka Senior Vice President, Marketing, Communications & Advocacy USGBC [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="3/4"][vc_column_text] [dropcaps type='normal' color='' background_color='' border_color='']W[/dropcaps]hen we set out to develop this issue of USGBC+ we chose the theme: leadership platforms. Each of us has a unique leadership platform—a set of values and beliefs for which we stand. Our platform may be known to others, or it may just be a quiet presence that guides our daily lives. In thinking about leadership, one of the things I’ve always thought of as the definition of a leader is someone who inspires purpose and progress but more importantly, someone who uses their leadership platform to make things better. By that definition, every single member of the USGBC community is a leader. USGBC and its 12,000 member companies, the more than 20 billion sq-ft of LEED projects, the hundreds of committee and community members, the volunteers, the 201,000 LEED Accredited Professionals (APs) and the 25,000 Greenbuild attendees are all inspiring purpose and progress and making things better. Whether it’s creating a new and innovative fixture that saves water, developing alternative materials that are healthier for people, identifying a new strategy...

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Campus Crusaders

[vc_row][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="18094" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_single_image image="24602" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text]  By Kiley Jacques [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] Student participation in LEED Lab has far-reaching impacts—from the classroom to the community to the consciousness of tomorrow’s green industry leaders. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="20"][vc_column_text] Sustainability at institutions of higher learning is increasingly evident around the globe, and USGBC’s LEED Lab has played a significant role in that achievement. The interactive, multidisciplinary immersion course is designed to transform the academic environment to prepare students for 21st-century careers in sustainability. [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="24611" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_column_text]UC Merced has set a goal to attain LEED certification for all of its buildings.[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_column_text] Sustainability at institutions of higher learning is increasingly evident around the globe, and USGBC’s LEED Lab has played a significant role in that achievement. The interactive, multidisciplinary immersion course is designed to transform the academic environment to prepare students for 21st-century careers in sustainability. In the course, students learn the principles of LEED and receive actual project experience by assessing the performance of existing facilities on their campus, facilitating the complete LEED Operations and Maintenance (O+M) process with the goal of achieving certification. LEED O+M ensures that the building...

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Collaborative Thinking

[vc_row][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="17498" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_single_image image="24641" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text]  By Alexandra Pecci [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] Lendlease strives to bring innovative ideas to life. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="20"][vc_column_text] When it comes to recycling, wallboard isn’t easy stuff to handle. It’s incredibly sensitive, losing its recyclability when it breaks into crumbs or powder, or even when it’s mixed with other waste. As a result, it often falls by the wayside in recycling efforts. But Geoffrey Brock, LEED AP BD+C, ID+C, ND, sustainability director at the global construction and property firm Lendlease, was eager to change that. After all, he points out, wallboard makes up 20 percent of construction waste, and can actually make up the majority of waste for interior projects. [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="24643" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_column_text]Lendlease created an innovation program in 2016 to gather ideas from all facets of the company. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" padding_top="20"][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_column_text] “We’re talking the magnitude of hundreds of tons of waste,” he says. “It means something more than just recycling at the office.” Despite the imperative, the desire, and the important idea, he had trouble getting a wallboard recycling initiative off the ground. “I was not very successful because I was...

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Latin Lessons

[vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" padding_bottom="15"][vc_column width="1/3"][vc_column_text] Latin Lessons [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] Students at the country’s oldest public high school are organizing and advocating to combat climate change.   By Calvin Hennick [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text]Students at Boston Latin School, established in 1635, are constantly reminded that their school is steeped in history. Every student learns Latin, a holdover from a long-ago time when the “dead” language was thought to be a necessary foundation for rigorous academic study. And when students enter the school’s auditorium, they look up at the walls and see the names of alumni luminaries who also appear in their history and literature textbooks: Ralph Waldo Emerson, John Hancock, Samuel Adams.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="2/3"][vc_single_image image="24687" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full" css=".vc_custom_1502473733961{margin-top: 5px !important;}"][vc_column_text]Boston Latin School students plant a vertical garden at the school—part of the Youth Climate Action Network (Youth Can).[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" padding_bottom="15"][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_column_text]But while the school’s illustrious past is a point of pride, its current students are focused squarely on the future. The school and its Youth Climate Action Network (Youth CAN) were named a 2017 Best of Green Schools honoree at the U.S. Green Building Council’s (USGBC) Green Schools Conference and Expo in Atlanta in March. Youth CAN was founded in 2007, and...

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Q&A with Felipe Faria

[vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" padding_top="50"][vc_column width="1/3"][vc_single_image image="24698" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="20"][vc_single_image image="24696" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_column_text css=".vc_custom_1502474228986{margin-top: 20px !important;}"]Felipe Faria graduated with a law degree in 2004 and completed a master’s in economic and corporate law at Fundação Getúlio Vargas in 2007. He spent three years as the civil court negotiator in the city of Barueri in the state of Sao Paulo. Currently, Felipe is the CEO of the Green Building Council Brasil, an organization that has accelerated the greening of Brazil’s construction industry, making it one of the top five markets in the world for LEED and influencing large-scale projects such as the 2014 FIFA World Cup and the 2016 Olympic Games. Illustration by: Tristan Chace[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="20"][/vc_column][vc_column width="2/3"][vc_column_text]Q.What is your greatest fear? Honestly, my greatest fear is a syringe. Q.Which historical figure do you most identify with? Historical figures inspire me a lot. I would name Joan of Arc. Her determination, courage, and faith are impressive. Q.Which living person do you most admire? Mr. Zé Luiz. He is an unknown hero who lives in a village located [in the] Amazon rainforest. He has an unbelievable ancestral knowledge and awareness about what really matters during our journey of life. And a two-hour conversation...

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Durable Design

[vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" padding_bottom="15"][vc_column width="1/3"][vc_column_text] Durable Design [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] Four USGBC Platinum level members are leading the way on resilient design.   By Aline Althen[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text]Design is at once an art form and a scientific pursuit. Good design takes equal parts intuition and education, perception and persistence. As designers are confronted with growing public and private interest in risk mitigation, climate change and responsible development, new challenges and opportunities are arising to define resilient building and community design.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="2/3"][vc_single_image image="24702" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full" css=".vc_custom_1502476096008{margin-top: 5px !important;}"][vc_column_text]Above and below: Dsigned by Perkins + Will, the Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts is proving its resilience both financially and experientially. A LEED Gold healthcare facility, the hospital is located on the water, providing an added benefit of water activities in patients’ rehab programs. photo credit: Anton Grassi / ESTO [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" padding_bottom="15"][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_column_text]Resilience is a buzzword, but for those working in the buildings sector it carries real weight and meaning. To design for resilience is to design for a long life – for an individual building or an entire community to outlast whatever may come, be it floods, fires, wind or a drastic economic downturn. “At the building scale, resilience is about ensuring...

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Material Matters

[vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" padding_bottom="15"][vc_column width="1/3"][vc_column_text] Material Matters [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] USGBC Platinum members are rising to the challenge of designing and making products that last.   By Amanda Sawit[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text]What do the Palace of Versailles and Denver International Airport have in common? Glass. Specifically glass produced by Saint-Gobain, which was founded more than 350 years ago when King Louis XIV commissioned it to produce glass for the iconic Hall of Mirrors. Today, the multi-national manufacturer has a diverse product portfolio (including the fiberglass used in Denver’s airport), and remains committed to making materials that stand the test of time, and sometimes, the forces of nature.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="2/3"][vc_single_image image="24729" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full" css=".vc_custom_1502478285416{margin-top: 5px !important;}"][vc_column_text]Saint-Gobain’s Sheerfill ® Fiberglass Architectural Membrane is a great example of durability by design. Denver International Airport is evidence of how a “fabric” could be used for the most abused surface in one of the hardest temperature-swing/UV light expose environments of any major airport in the U.S. Credit: Saint-Gobain Performance Plastics [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" padding_bottom="15"][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_column_text]Out of all the elements in the building envelope, roofs, windows and doors are likely your suspected points of vulnerability, and you’d be right. Breaches during extreme weather events have given rise to rapid...

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Efficient Data

[vc_row][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="21415" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_single_image image="24664" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text]  By Lorne Bell [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] Data centers power our digital lives, using immense amounts of energy to connect people and information around the world. Now, LEED is helping the world’s top data companies find new paths to energy efficiency. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="20"][vc_column_text] If you’ve ever left a running laptop on a surface for too long, you know the kind of heat that it can generate. Now imagine that amount of heat magnified by ceiling-high server towers that fill buildings the size of football fields. Data centers are designed to run 24 hours a day, every day of the year. Powering and cooling these information hubs requires massive amounts of energy—consider that one data center can use as much energy as a small town. Cumulatively, data centers across the U.S. used 70 billion kWh of electricity in 2014, according to Lawrence Berkeley National Lab’s Data Center Energy Usage Report. That’s about 2 percent of the nation’s electricity, the same amount used by some 6.4 million U.S. homes.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="24666" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_column_text]DPR’s Prineville, Oregon, data center for Facebook is one of the most energy efficient...

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