This Issue

2017 March-April

Committed to Sustainability and Resilience

[vc_row][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="23824" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width="1/4"][vc_single_image image="23822" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] Mayor Kasim Reed Mayor of Atlanta, Georgia [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="3/4"][vc_column_text] [dropcaps type='normal' color='' background_color='' border_color='']A[/dropcaps]tlanta is the most vibrant, culturally significant and international city in the Southeast, the anchor of the ninth-largest metropolitan area in the United States with a population of 5.5 million, centered in the eighth biggest state in the union. We are an emerging global force with a GDP of more than $305 billion. We are also a city committed to innovation and progress, as well as an exporter of culture and change. As a result, Atlanta is emerging as a national and international leader in sustainability and resilience. We recently implemented a special-purpose local option sales tax for transportation to generate approximately $300 million over a five-year period to fund significant and expansive transportation projects citywide. We have conducted several infrastructure improvements under the $250 million Renew Atlanta bond program; hired the first-ever urban agriculture director, who works to bring local, healthy food within a half-mile of 75 percent of all Atlanta residents by year 2020; and adopted an affordable-housing ordinance that reserves a percentage of housing throughout the City for working families. In...

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Learning by Design

[vc_row][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="18094" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_single_image image="23847" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] By Kiley Jacques [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] Green design features add a layer of learning to three acclaimed cultural institutions. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="20"][vc_column_text] Boston Children’s Museum, the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC), and the Barnes Foundation are seemingly disparate projects. A closer look reveals their common thread: Sustainability is the tie. Enhanced visitor experience is the cloth from which all three were cut. Layered together, they begin to form the fabric of future museum design. Boston Children’s Museum Originally located in Jamaica Plain, Boston Children’s Museum moved to its current location in 1979. A recent Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Gold-certified expansion by the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) member Cambridge Seven Associates (C7A) has breathed new life into the dated building, offering diverse educational experiences for a new generation.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="23849" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_column_text]Boston Children’s Museum harvests stormwater from both the green roof and main roof for building services such as irrigation and dual flush toilets. This helps to reduce water runoff into Fort Point Channel by 88 percent and potable water demand and use by 77 percent. Photo: ©...

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Bio Building

[vc_row][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="16705" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_single_image image="23879" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] By Kiley Jacques [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] Biologist and author Janine Benyus shares sustainable, nature-inspired solutions to some of the challenges facing today’s green building professionals. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="20"][vc_column_text] Were it not for biologist Janine Benyus’s keen interest in nature’s systems, the term “biomimicry” may not have been coined. Defined as “an approach to innovation that seeks sustainable solutions to human challenges by emulating nature’s time-tested patterns and strategies,” biomimicry can be applied to any number of situations in the fields of science, architecture, and engineering. [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="23880" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_column_text]Janine Benyus, biologist, author, and founder of consulting firm, Biomimicry 3.8.[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" padding_bottom="25"][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_column_text]A natural history writer, Benyus has published multiple books about the ways in which plants and animals adapt to their habitats. These “ecosystem-first” field guides are intended to help people find nature-inspired solutions to challenges facing the green building industry and beyond. “That adaptation to place always has to do with these amazing technologies,” explains Benyus, citing examples that include UV-resistant animals living in high altitudes and thriving with thin air; and those living at the bottom...

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Smart Park

[vc_row][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="17498" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_single_image image="23896" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] By Mary Grauerholz [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] How parking garages are becoming the newest city parks. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="20"][vc_column_text] Boston has almost 7.5 million square feet of designated, off-street parking space. Wide swaths of concrete, asphalt, and steel, often spattered with oil from vehicles and salt from roadways. The parking facilities in this East Coast city—and across the country—have long been an egregious land-hog. But that is changing. Parksmart, formerly Green Garage Certification, is a relatively new addition to the suite of sustainability rating systems administered by the Green Business Certification Inc. (GBCI) and was developed with the support of the International Parking Institute. Parking facilities are rated on the basis of sustainable practices in management, programming, and technological design. As a result, parking structures now have an opportunity to show communities how they can be more environmentally friendly, by finding innovative ways to reduce energy consumption, maximize performance, and minimize waste.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="23902" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_column_text]Post Office Square is mitigating 100 percent of its electricity footprint with renewable energy under a 25-year Power Purchase Agreement, partnering with MIT and Boston Medical Center, to purchase all...

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Sustainable Lessons

[vc_row][vc_column width="2/3"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="23828" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_single_image image="23827" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] By Jeff Harder [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] The public schools of Lake Mills are becoming high-performance centers of learning. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="20"][vc_column_text] About 35 miles east of Wisconsin’s state capital is Lake Mills—quintessential suburbia with a gazebo-adorned town center, a weekly farmer’s market, and the rural neighborliness of Anytown, USA. But until recently, its Eisenhower-era Prospect Elementary School was an eye-sore in the community: a rambling collection of brick buildings with boarded-up windows, lights casting a headache-inducing yellow, buckets to capture rain pouring through a leaky roof, and mildew growing in storage rooms. “Every classroom I walked into smelled damp and stale,” says Theresa Lehman, a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) AP, a LEED Fellow, LEED faculty member, and director of sustainable services for Wisconsin’s Miron Construction—the firm responsible for building a new school for the community. Bad air quality and poor ventilation led to increases in allergies and absences among students and staff, and lack of daylight and poor acoustics made it a difficult place to teach and learn. [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/3"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="23831" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_column_text]Theresa Lehman, LEED AP, LEED Fellow, LEED faculty member,...

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Accessible and Sustainable

[vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" padding_bottom="15"][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_column_text] Accessible and Sustainable [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] Ron Rambo brings a unique approach to green living.   By Alexandra Pecci[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text]Ron Rambo is many things: a friend, a son, a volunteer and advocate for the disabled community, and a well-known figure of the city of Lancaster, Pennsylvania. Now, he’s adding the word “pioneer” to that list, thanks to the Rambo Project, a cutting-edge home that will not only provide a totally accessible place for him to live with his wheelchair, but also one that will be radically sustainable. Nicknamed “Ramboland,” this ambitious project has been years in the making and has attracted the attention and cooperation of green builders, designers, government officials, and many others who have been inspired by Rambo’s desire to create a home that embodies the word “independent” in every way, from personal independence for the disabled, to complete energy and water independence for the home itself. “I hope this house will give me a more safe and accessible home with more independence, including independence from high utility bills!” says Rambo.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_single_image image="23929" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full" css=".vc_custom_1490022532416{margin-top: 5px !important;}"][vc_column_text]Rob Rambo—when he’s not working on his dream home—hangs out at Square One coffee with his friends...

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Q&A with Jennifer Seydel

[vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" padding_top="50"][vc_column width="1/3"][vc_single_image image="23950" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="20"][vc_single_image image="23948" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_column_text css=".vc_custom_1490024821106{margin-top: 20px !important;}"]An educator with more than 35 years’ experience preparing youth for success in an ever-changing world, Jennifer Seydel is the executive director of the Green Schools National Network where she brings together all sectors invested in green, healthy, sustainable schools through professional development, network development, and research. Illustration by: Tristan Chace[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="20"][/vc_column][vc_column width="2/3"][vc_column_text]Q.What is your greatest fear? Not making the most of each day. Q.Which historical figure do you most identify with? Rachel Carson Q.Which living person do you most admire? Michelle Obama Q.What is your greatest extravagance? My new Trek bicycle! Q.What is your favorite journey? Any hike or paddle into the backcountry! Q.What do you consider the most overrated virtue? Patience. We do not have the time to wait…the future is at stake! Q.Which words or phrases do you most overuse? I grew up in a military family and picked up some colorful language. I am not sure you would want to print them! Q.What is your greatest regret? I try to live life without regrets. Any regret I have ever had, I have addressed so that it does not linger. Q.Which talent would you most like to have? The ability to tell a good...

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