This Issue

2017 May-June

Greener Partners

[vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" padding_bottom="15"][vc_column width="2/3"][vc_column_text] Greener Partners [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] For Starbucks, fostering local leaders is key to delivering on its commitments to the community and the environment.   By Amanda Sawit[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text]Like its logo, the effects of Starbucks global sustainability commitments can be seen pretty much everywhere. For more than 30 years, the coffee company has integrated sustainability into nearly every facet of its stores, from the way they are designed, decorated, and maintained, down to the waste management and recycling of products after use. [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/3"][vc_single_image image="24541" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full" css=".vc_custom_1496329875189{margin-top: 5px !important;}"][vc_column_text]Greener Apron completion pin[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" padding_bottom="15"][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_column_text] [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left"][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="10"][vc_single_image image="24547" alignment="center" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_column_text]Starbucks designated thousandth LEED-certified store, located in the campus town of Ames, Iowa, was awarded LEED Silver under the Interior Design and Construction (ID+C) rating system and posted notable resource savings, including a 30 percent reduction in energy consumption. Image courtesy of Starbucks Coffee Company. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="20"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" padding_bottom="15"][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_column_text]Much of this has to do with the coffee company’s global efforts to meet Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) standards. But it didn’t reach more than 1,200 LEED-certified stores overnight. Early on, Starbucks was...

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On the Home Front

[vc_row][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="18094" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_single_image image="24161" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text]  By Alexandra Pecci [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] USGBC’s Green Home Guide website offers homeowners sound advice for better living. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="20"][vc_column_text] After installing high-efficiency appliances and lighting during renovations of her Eichler home, Elizabeth Milne, a lawyer from Palo Alto, California, was shocked to see her electricity bill actually go up. The culprit? A newly installed instant hot water heater on the sink that immediately provided boiling water—but that also relied on an always-running heating coil that kept the water at a high temperature 24 hours a day. “I just unplugged it and my utility bill went down,” she says. [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="24165" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_column_text]Private Allentown residence pool garden. William Dohe, AIA, LEED AP, Project Architect. Photo: Alyssha Eve Csuk[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" padding_bottom="25" padding_top="20"][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_column_text] Like many, Milne is on a journey to green her home. In addition to installing better appliances, she also repainted the walls with low-VOC paint and replaced the kitchen backsplash with tiles made from recycled glass. But she wants to do more—on a reasonable budget—and has questions about things like graywater reuse, the most environmentally friendly furniture, the...

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Growing Detroit

[vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left"][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="16705" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_single_image image="24195" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] By Kiley Jacques [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] Motor City is poised to become the epicenter of urban agriculture. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="20"][vc_column_text] It’s no secret Detroit has suffered. The postindustrial city’s economic and demographic downturn has left it in a compromised state for decades. But in a two-square-block area of its North End, change is afoot. In 2011, the Michigan Urban Farming Initiative (MUFI), an all-volunteer nonprofit organization, purchased a defunct apartment complex at auction. And ever since, MUFI president and co-founder, Tyson Gersh, has been building something altogether new—the nation’s first urban “agrihood.” [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="24200" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_column_text]7432 Brush Street is a distressed property in Detroit that was purchased by MUFI in October 2011. It was built in 1915 and used continuously until circa 2009. The goal is to restore the structure to a community resource center that will help foster sustainability and urban renewal.[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" padding_bottom="25"][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_column_text] There are about 200 agrihood models currently operating in rural and suburban areas around the country, but this is the first infill-style model. “To take it a degree further,” says Gersh,...

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Investing in the Green Economy

[vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left"][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="17498" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_single_image image="24233" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] By Calvin Hennick [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] Responding to the risks posed by climate change is no longer reserved for socially responsible companies. There is now a clear priority for all businesses that want a prosperous future. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="20"][vc_column_text] A car in the 1970s traveled, on average, fewer than 15 miles on a gallon of gasoline. Today, that number is pushing 35. Around a decade ago, solar power was still largely seen as a niche energy source, reserved for organizations that were either exceptionally enthusiastic about sustainability or the recipients of large subsidies. Today, utilities are leading investment in solar with a doubling of U.S. large-scale solar projects to about nine gigawatts in 2016, while suburbanites are topping their roofs with solar panels, slashing their energy bills and even sometimes selling some back to the grid. [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="24235" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_column_text]A solar panel is produced at SolarWorld, America’s largest manufacturer of solar panels.[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" padding_bottom="25"][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_column_text] What changed? The marketplace. Over time, gasoline became more expensive, and the cost of solar panels came down quite a bit. In...

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In Step with Sustainability

[vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" padding_bottom="15"][vc_column width="1/3"][vc_column_text] In Step with Sustainability [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] Saint Anthony Village is winning accolades for moving toward becoming a green city.   By Mary Grauerholz[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][/vc_column][vc_column width="2/3"][vc_single_image image="24248" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full" css=".vc_custom_1496155541808{margin-top: 5px !important;}"][vc_column_text]Saint Anthony regional stormwater treatment and research system illustration.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" padding_bottom="15"][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_column_text]For a town of fewer than 10,000 residents, Saint Anthony Village in Minnesota is more than ahead of the environmental curve; you could say the city is designing the road. In 2016, Saint Anthony—the first town in Minnesota to incorporate the reuse of water—received the state’s Sustainable City Award. Several years before that, the village became a GreenStep City in a voluntary program run by the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency that helps the state’s cities achieve their sustainability and quality-of-life goals. Joining GreenStep fit like a glove with Saint Anthony’s environmental vision for its 2018 Comprehensive Plan, which has been in the works for years. But the town didn’t stop there. Stakeholders, including residents and city officials, added an extra “chapter,” or section, to the plan to drill even deeper into a more environmentally minded community. The other chapters cover land use, housing, transportation infrastructure, and environmental and water resource goals—this new...

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Q&A with Mark Ginsberg

[vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" padding_top="50"][vc_column width="1/3"][vc_single_image image="24273" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="20"][vc_single_image image="24271" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_column_text css=".vc_custom_1496156682146{margin-top: 20px !important;}"]Mark Ginsberg founded Ginsberg Green Strategies in January 2012 to consult on eco-cities, energy efficiency, and renewable energy. In Fall 2012, the U.S. Green Building Council designated Ginsberg as the first USGBC senior fellow, where he serves as a senior policy advisor and ambassador. Prior to that, he served as a senior executive at the U.S. Department of Energy for 20 years and the Arizona Energy Office for 10 years. Illustration by: Tristan Chace[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="20"][/vc_column][vc_column width="2/3"][vc_column_text]Q.What is your greatest fear? That logic may not always prevail. I am a person of reason and facts—and I fear that we are in an era of denial of truth, science, and logic. Q.Which historical figure do you most identify with? One could hope to be Jefferson, Edison, or Plato, but I more relate to the “humble bureaucrat” who has a garden in China dedicated to him and other civil servants. Q.Which living person do you most admire? Barack Obama for his values, humility, thoughtfulness, perseverance under fire, and for being a class act. Q.What is your greatest extravagance? Prime season tickets for Washington Wizards basketball. Q.What is your favorite journey? A sentimental...

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Sustainable Win

[vc_row][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="24153" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width="1/4"][vc_single_image image="24157" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] Dave St. Peter President and CEO, Minnesota Twins [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="3/4"][vc_column_text] [dropcaps type='normal' color='' background_color='' border_color='']A[/dropcaps]ustainability doesn’t always come to mind when you think of professional baseball. But with bright lights, open skies, and thousands of fans filling the seats at any given game, the Minnesota Twins recognize the role energy and water efficiency, reduced waste, and sustainability education play in creating the best possible experience for our fans, players, and community. Professional sports franchises have the ability to create local change that can set an example and have a truly global impact when it comes to sustainability initiatives. We don’t take this responsibility lightly. When Target Field opened in 2010, the facility was quickly dubbed “the Greenest Ballpark in America.” Target Field earned Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Silver thanks to many sustainability features integrated into the design and construction of our facility. Never resting on our laurels, the Twins organization then pursued LEED for Existing Buildings to ensure our operations and maintenance practices remained cutting edge and continued to improve. And just a few weeks ago, we were honored when Target Field became the first...

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