This Issue

COMMUNITY

Learning by Design

[vc_row][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="18094" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_single_image image="23847" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] By Kiley Jacques [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] Green design features add a layer of learning to three acclaimed cultural institutions. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="20"][vc_column_text] Boston Children’s Museum, the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC), and the Barnes Foundation are seemingly disparate projects. A closer look reveals their common thread: Sustainability is the tie. Enhanced visitor experience is the cloth from which all three were cut. Layered together, they begin to form the fabric of future museum design. Boston Children’s Museum Originally located in Jamaica Plain, Boston Children’s Museum moved to its current location in 1979. A recent Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Gold-certified expansion by the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) member Cambridge Seven Associates (C7A) has breathed new life into the dated building, offering diverse educational experiences for a new generation.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="23849" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_column_text]Boston Children’s Museum harvests stormwater from both the green roof and main roof for building services such as irrigation and dual flush toilets. This helps to reduce water runoff into Fort Point Channel by 88 percent and potable water demand and use by 77 percent. Photo: ©...

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Accessible and Sustainable

[vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" padding_bottom="15"][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_column_text] Accessible and Sustainable [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] Ron Rambo brings a unique approach to green living.   By Alexandra Pecci[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text]Ron Rambo is many things: a friend, a son, a volunteer and advocate for the disabled community, and a well-known figure of the city of Lancaster, Pennsylvania. Now, he’s adding the word “pioneer” to that list, thanks to the Rambo Project, a cutting-edge home that will not only provide a totally accessible place for him to live with his wheelchair, but also one that will be radically sustainable. Nicknamed “Ramboland,” this ambitious project has been years in the making and has attracted the attention and cooperation of green builders, designers, government officials, and many others who have been inspired by Rambo’s desire to create a home that embodies the word “independent” in every way, from personal independence for the disabled, to complete energy and water independence for the home itself. “I hope this house will give me a more safe and accessible home with more independence, including independence from high utility bills!” says Rambo.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_single_image image="23929" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full" css=".vc_custom_1490022532416{margin-top: 5px !important;}"][vc_column_text]Rob Rambo—when he’s not working on his dream home—hangs out at Square One coffee with his friends...

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All the Difference

[vc_row][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="18094" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_single_image image="23491" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] By Kiley Jacques [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] Lava Mae addresses a chronic challenge facing homeless populations. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="20"][vc_column_text] With its mission to “take radical hospitality to the street,” Lava Mae gives people experiencing homelessness access to shower facilities—by making them mobile. Founded in San Francisco in 2014, Lava Mae converts retired city buses into hygiene facilities to deliver showers and “rekindle dignity.” “Homelessness is something that had been on my radar for a while,” says Doniece Sandoval, Lava Mae’s founder and chief executive officer. “It’s an incredibly visible issue in this city.” Sandoval describes her own neighborhood’s gentrification, recalling elderly neighbors who ended up first living in their cars after being evicted, then on the streets—“gentlemen in their 80s, so unprepared for that kind of life. No one is prepared for [that].” She watched as they suffered their circumstances, and she tried, impossibly, to explain their situation to her then-five-year-old daughter. That marked the start of what would become her true life’s work. [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="23493" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_column_text]Doniece Sandoval, Lava Mae’s founder and chief executive officer, with regional director Paul Asplund. Photo: Emily Hagopian[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center"...

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In the Green Lap of Luxury

[vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" padding_bottom="15"][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_column_text] In the Green Lap of Luxury [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] The Fairmont Washington, D.C., Georgetown reimagines sustainability in a 24/7 business.   By Amanda Sawit [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text]Nestled at the intersection of four busy neighborhoods in the nation’s capital, the stately 10-story Fairmont Washington, D.C., Georgetown has served both local and global communities since 1985. Movie buffs might recognize the hotel from the spy-thriller Enemy of the State, and the hotel has hosted an array of iconic figures, from Muhammad Ali to Arnold Schwarzenegger, in addition to visiting heads of state. From the crisp white marble floors to the light-flooded oasis of a lobby, the four-diamond hotel is nothing short of luxurious. And it might be the last place in town where you would expect to find honeybees.[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="20"][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_single_image image="23213" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full" css=".vc_custom_1481228040377{margin-top: 5px !important;}"][vc_column_text]Shane Krige, general manager of the Fairmont, D.C. Photo: Ana L. Ka’ahanui[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left"][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_column_text]The bees, which are guests of the hotel’s roof, have become a symbol of the Fairmont’s dedication to the environment and sustainable practices. As part of a 24-month-long renovation, the Fairmont is currently pursuing Leadership for Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) for Building Operations and Maintenance...

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Collective Impact

[vc_row css=".vc_custom_1469033175715{margin-bottom: 20px !important;}" row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left"][vc_column width="1/3"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="18094" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_single_image image="22817" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] By Kiley Jacques [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] Once a defunct naval shipyard, Century Villages of Cabrillo supports a diverse community of once-homeless individuals and families. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="20"][vc_column_text] "On any given night of the year, 1,300 people—either formerly homeless or at risk of becoming homeless—find housing at Century Villages of Cabrillo (CVC) in Long Beach, California. The residents are as diverse as the services available to them. Those who have found their way into the community have discovered a supportive environment where counseling, case management, healthcare, life skills programming, and employment resources are at their disposal. “We really try to surround our residents with all the tools they need to take that next step in their lives, whatever that may be,” says senior vice president of housing for Century Housing, Brian D’Andrea. [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="2/3"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full" image="22828"][vc_column_text]Century Villages of Cabrillo in Long Beach, California, proves housing for 1,300 formerly homeless or at-risk of becoming homeless. Century villages is owned by Century Housing, a community development financial institution. [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" padding_bottom="25" padding_top="20"][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_column_text] Century Housing, a leading community development...

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Building a Legacy

[vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" padding_bottom="15"][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_column_text] Building a Legacy [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] Eco-Tech Makerspace is this year’s Greenbuild Legacy Project.   By Alexandra Pecci[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text]When Isai German, T4T.org’s STEAM Lab coordinator, saw a call for proposals for the U.S. Green Building Council’s (USGBC) 2016 Greenbuild Legacy Project, he knew his organization would be the perfect fit. After all, T4T.org is dedicated to using sustainable materials, championing stewardship, and education. There was just one problem. “It was due in six days,” German says of the proposal. The tight time frame was no deterrent, though, and soon after, German got the good news: T4T.org’s Eco-Tech Makerspace would be this year’s Greenbuild Legacy Project. “I got the letter at 11:00 at night before I went to bed,” he says. “I started jumping!” All that jumping and enthusiasm is certainly warranted. Through the Greenbuild Legacy Project, T4T.org is the recipient of a $10,000 grant and support to add a much-needed technology component to its already innovative and exciting work. T4T.org, formerly known as Trash for Teaching, is a nonprofit educational program that reclaims safe landfill-bound items and reuses them for educational building projects. “We collect manufacturers’ waste: Castoffs, mistakes on the factory room floor,” says Leah Hanes, PhD, the...

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Inner Leaders

[vc_row][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="18094" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_single_image image="22840" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] By Alexandra DeLuca [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] Environmental Charter Schools challenge their students to examine how they think about the environment. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="20"][vc_column_text] Stepping onto the Lawndale campus of a growing network of charter schools in the south Los Angeles area, visitors are greeted by an atypical environment for ninth to twelfth graders. In addition to students and teachers, chickens and rabbits populate grounds housing a stream and fruit trees, called “free vending machines,” with signs that implore you to “reach out and help yourself.” [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="22842" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_column_text]Julie Vo is the development manager of Environmental Charter Schools, which operates three public schools in the south Los Angeles area. The schools challenge kids to think about the scope of the environment and their role in it.[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" padding_bottom="25"][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_column_text] “We often tell people that you really have to come and see it for yourself,” says Julie Vo, development manager of Environmental Charter Schools (ECS), which was established in 2000 and now operates three free public schools with more than 1,000 students. “I can send photos and compose lengthy emails,...

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Legendary Leader

[vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" padding_bottom="15"][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_column_text] Legendary Leader [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] Allison Cunningham is recognized as a Legendary Leader Volunteer at USGBC’s Convergence.   By Alexandra Pecci[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text]When Allison Cunningham worked as a volunteer for CHaRM, Atlanta’s Center for Hard to Recycle Materials, her task was not a glamorous one. “My job was to sort through batteries,” she says. That was in addition to helping to galvanize and organize other U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) volunteers for a monthlong commitment to help the newly opened facility sort through the old tires, mattresses, herbicides, pesticides, paints, and other hard-to-recycle materials that had been dropped off there. When it comes to her volunteer work, Cunningham is a get-your-hands-dirty, lace-up-your-boots kind of person. She does not want to simply organize and talk about an event: “I want to be at the event,” she says. “It’s rewarding to actually be doing it, boots on the ground, and getting out there and talking to people.” That hands-on work ethic is why Cunningham, LEED project reviewer and senior project manager, for Ecoworks Studio in Atlanta, is the Legendary Leader award winner for this year’s Convergence Volunteer Awards. Cunningham has worked with USGBC Georgia for six years as both a member and...

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Nurturing The Future

[vc_row][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="18094" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_single_image image="22407" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] By Kiley Jacques [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] USGBC’s Learning Lab equips educators with the resources needed to shape environmentally literate students. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="20"][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="22408" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_column_text]Mundo Verde Public Charter School sustainability coordinator Tara McNerney and Jenny Wiedower, K-12 manager at The Center for Green Schools. Photo by: Ana L. Ka'ahanui. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" padding_bottom="25"][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_column_text] Ensuring an educational experience that supports a sustainable future is the bedrock of the Center for Green Schools at the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). In August 2015, they decided to add digital material to prepare students for 21st century jobs, many of which are in the green industry sector. To start, Jenny Wiedower, K-12 manager at the Center for Green Schools, and her colleagues took cues from the U.S. Department of Education’s Green Ribbon Schools Program, which recognizes schools making green strides. According to Wiedower, those strides include measures taken to reduce negative impacts on the environment, increase health and wellness, and produce environmentally literate graduates. “Our role in that third pillar was very nominal,” says Wiedower. “We wanted to do what we could.” So,...

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Eco Sin Confessions

[vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" padding_top="25"][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_single_image image="18094" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_single_image image="22089" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_column_text] By Alexandra Pecci [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] Holley Henderson dispels the notion that environmentalists have to be perfect to be effective. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] Holley Henderson might be a vegetarian, but do not ask her to pass on bacon, especially if it is cooked by her mom. “Regardless of your carbon footprint, my mom’s bacon and grits can convert any vegetarian,” she says with a laugh and a subtle Birmingham, Alabama, twang. “I mean that woman can seriously cook.” Being a bacon-eating vegetarian is not the only seemingly contradictory part of Henderson’s personality. Sure, she is a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Fellow, an environmental building speaker and consultant, founder of the Atlanta-based H2 Ecodesign, and author of the book, Becoming a Green Building Professional. But she is the first to admit her own “eco sins.” “I love a very long and very hot shower,” she says. In the car, she likes to turn on the heat, including the seat warmer, and roll the windows down. [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_single_image image="22090" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_column_text css=".vc_custom_1462387654824{margin-bottom: 20px !important;}"] Holley Henderson, LEED Fellow. [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_column_text] She regularly confesses these sins for a reason: to dispel the idea that...

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