This Issue

COMMUNITY

Green Backing

[vc_row][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="18094" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_single_image image="24940" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text]  By Kiley Jacques [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] Architect, policy maker, and green school champion Joseph da Silva advocates for integration and collaboration on every front. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="20"][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="24944" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_column_text]Joseph da Silva has been on the forefront of the green schools movement in New England.[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_column_text] Joseph da Silva, Ph.D., has a unique perspective when it comes to school buildings. The first-generation immigrant was born in the Azores, Portugal, which he describes as “an environmental paradise.” Upon moving to the United States as a young boy, he entered the public school system, where he became distinctly aware of his surroundings. “I really connected with the space of the classroom because it was so foreign to anything I had ever experienced,” he recalls. “I was exposed to the fact that schools have all of these unique spaces. They have auditoriums, theaters, offices, classrooms, and athletic facilities—all together in one place. That was fascinating to me. That was when I started really focusing on architecture and school buildings.” That formative time set him on a path from which he has never strayed. He earned...

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Campus Crusaders

[vc_row][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="18094" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_single_image image="24602" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text]  By Kiley Jacques [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] Student participation in LEED Lab has far-reaching impacts—from the classroom to the community to the consciousness of tomorrow’s green industry leaders. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="20"][vc_column_text] Sustainability at institutions of higher learning is increasingly evident around the globe, and USGBC’s LEED Lab has played a significant role in that achievement. The interactive, multidisciplinary immersion course is designed to transform the academic environment to prepare students for 21st-century careers in sustainability. [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="24611" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_column_text]UC Merced has set a goal to attain LEED certification for all of its buildings.[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_column_text] Sustainability at institutions of higher learning is increasingly evident around the globe, and USGBC’s LEED Lab has played a significant role in that achievement. The interactive, multidisciplinary immersion course is designed to transform the academic environment to prepare students for 21st-century careers in sustainability. In the course, students learn the principles of LEED and receive actual project experience by assessing the performance of existing facilities on their campus, facilitating the complete LEED Operations and Maintenance (O+M) process with the goal of achieving certification. LEED O+M ensures that the building...

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Latin Lessons

[vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" padding_bottom="15"][vc_column width="1/3"][vc_column_text] Latin Lessons [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] Students at the country’s oldest public high school are organizing and advocating to combat climate change.   By Calvin Hennick [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text]Students at Boston Latin School, established in 1635, are constantly reminded that their school is steeped in history. Every student learns Latin, a holdover from a long-ago time when the “dead” language was thought to be a necessary foundation for rigorous academic study. And when students enter the school’s auditorium, they look up at the walls and see the names of alumni luminaries who also appear in their history and literature textbooks: Ralph Waldo Emerson, John Hancock, Samuel Adams.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="2/3"][vc_single_image image="24687" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full" css=".vc_custom_1502473733961{margin-top: 5px !important;}"][vc_column_text]Boston Latin School students plant a vertical garden at the school—part of the Youth Climate Action Network (Youth Can).[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" padding_bottom="15"][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_column_text]But while the school’s illustrious past is a point of pride, its current students are focused squarely on the future. The school and its Youth Climate Action Network (Youth CAN) were named a 2017 Best of Green Schools honoree at the U.S. Green Building Council’s (USGBC) Green Schools Conference and Expo in Atlanta in March. Youth CAN was founded in 2007, and...

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On the Home Front

[vc_row][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="18094" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_single_image image="24161" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text]  By Alexandra Pecci [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] USGBC’s Green Home Guide website offers homeowners sound advice for better living. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="20"][vc_column_text] After installing high-efficiency appliances and lighting during renovations of her Eichler home, Elizabeth Milne, a lawyer from Palo Alto, California, was shocked to see her electricity bill actually go up. The culprit? A newly installed instant hot water heater on the sink that immediately provided boiling water—but that also relied on an always-running heating coil that kept the water at a high temperature 24 hours a day. “I just unplugged it and my utility bill went down,” she says. [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="24165" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_column_text]Private Allentown residence pool garden. William Dohe, AIA, LEED AP, Project Architect. Photo: Alyssha Eve Csuk[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" padding_bottom="25" padding_top="20"][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_column_text] Like many, Milne is on a journey to green her home. In addition to installing better appliances, she also repainted the walls with low-VOC paint and replaced the kitchen backsplash with tiles made from recycled glass. But she wants to do more—on a reasonable budget—and has questions about things like graywater reuse, the most environmentally friendly furniture, the...

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In Step with Sustainability

[vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" padding_bottom="15"][vc_column width="1/3"][vc_column_text] In Step with Sustainability [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] Saint Anthony Village is winning accolades for moving toward becoming a green city.   By Mary Grauerholz[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][/vc_column][vc_column width="2/3"][vc_single_image image="24248" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full" css=".vc_custom_1496155541808{margin-top: 5px !important;}"][vc_column_text]Saint Anthony regional stormwater treatment and research system illustration.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" padding_bottom="15"][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_column_text]For a town of fewer than 10,000 residents, Saint Anthony Village in Minnesota is more than ahead of the environmental curve; you could say the city is designing the road. In 2016, Saint Anthony—the first town in Minnesota to incorporate the reuse of water—received the state’s Sustainable City Award. Several years before that, the village became a GreenStep City in a voluntary program run by the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency that helps the state’s cities achieve their sustainability and quality-of-life goals. Joining GreenStep fit like a glove with Saint Anthony’s environmental vision for its 2018 Comprehensive Plan, which has been in the works for years. But the town didn’t stop there. Stakeholders, including residents and city officials, added an extra “chapter,” or section, to the plan to drill even deeper into a more environmentally minded community. The other chapters cover land use, housing, transportation infrastructure, and environmental and water resource goals—this new...

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Learning by Design

[vc_row][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="18094" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_single_image image="23847" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] By Kiley Jacques [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] Green design features add a layer of learning to three acclaimed cultural institutions. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="20"][vc_column_text] Boston Children’s Museum, the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC), and the Barnes Foundation are seemingly disparate projects. A closer look reveals their common thread: Sustainability is the tie. Enhanced visitor experience is the cloth from which all three were cut. Layered together, they begin to form the fabric of future museum design. Boston Children’s Museum Originally located in Jamaica Plain, Boston Children’s Museum moved to its current location in 1979. A recent Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Gold-certified expansion by the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) member Cambridge Seven Associates (C7A) has breathed new life into the dated building, offering diverse educational experiences for a new generation.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="23849" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_column_text]Boston Children’s Museum harvests stormwater from both the green roof and main roof for building services such as irrigation and dual flush toilets. This helps to reduce water runoff into Fort Point Channel by 88 percent and potable water demand and use by 77 percent. Photo: ©...

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Accessible and Sustainable

[vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" padding_bottom="15"][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_column_text] Accessible and Sustainable [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] Ron Rambo brings a unique approach to green living.   By Alexandra Pecci[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text]Ron Rambo is many things: a friend, a son, a volunteer and advocate for the disabled community, and a well-known figure of the city of Lancaster, Pennsylvania. Now, he’s adding the word “pioneer” to that list, thanks to the Rambo Project, a cutting-edge home that will not only provide a totally accessible place for him to live with his wheelchair, but also one that will be radically sustainable. Nicknamed “Ramboland,” this ambitious project has been years in the making and has attracted the attention and cooperation of green builders, designers, government officials, and many others who have been inspired by Rambo’s desire to create a home that embodies the word “independent” in every way, from personal independence for the disabled, to complete energy and water independence for the home itself. “I hope this house will give me a more safe and accessible home with more independence, including independence from high utility bills!” says Rambo.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_single_image image="23929" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full" css=".vc_custom_1490022532416{margin-top: 5px !important;}"][vc_column_text]Rob Rambo—when he’s not working on his dream home—hangs out at Square One coffee with his friends...

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All the Difference

[vc_row][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="18094" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_single_image image="23491" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] By Kiley Jacques [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] Lava Mae addresses a chronic challenge facing homeless populations. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="20"][vc_column_text] With its mission to “take radical hospitality to the street,” Lava Mae gives people experiencing homelessness access to shower facilities—by making them mobile. Founded in San Francisco in 2014, Lava Mae converts retired city buses into hygiene facilities to deliver showers and “rekindle dignity.” “Homelessness is something that had been on my radar for a while,” says Doniece Sandoval, Lava Mae’s founder and chief executive officer. “It’s an incredibly visible issue in this city.” Sandoval describes her own neighborhood’s gentrification, recalling elderly neighbors who ended up first living in their cars after being evicted, then on the streets—“gentlemen in their 80s, so unprepared for that kind of life. No one is prepared for [that].” She watched as they suffered their circumstances, and she tried, impossibly, to explain their situation to her then-five-year-old daughter. That marked the start of what would become her true life’s work. [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="23493" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_column_text]Doniece Sandoval, Lava Mae’s founder and chief executive officer, with regional director Paul Asplund. Photo: Emily Hagopian[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center"...

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In the Green Lap of Luxury

[vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" padding_bottom="15"][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_column_text] In the Green Lap of Luxury [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] The Fairmont Washington, D.C., Georgetown reimagines sustainability in a 24/7 business.   By Amanda Sawit [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text]Nestled at the intersection of four busy neighborhoods in the nation’s capital, the stately 10-story Fairmont Washington, D.C., Georgetown has served both local and global communities since 1985. Movie buffs might recognize the hotel from the spy-thriller Enemy of the State, and the hotel has hosted an array of iconic figures, from Muhammad Ali to Arnold Schwarzenegger, in addition to visiting heads of state. From the crisp white marble floors to the light-flooded oasis of a lobby, the four-diamond hotel is nothing short of luxurious. And it might be the last place in town where you would expect to find honeybees.[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="20"][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_single_image image="23213" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full" css=".vc_custom_1481228040377{margin-top: 5px !important;}"][vc_column_text]Shane Krige, general manager of the Fairmont, D.C. Photo: Ana L. Ka’ahanui[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left"][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_column_text]The bees, which are guests of the hotel’s roof, have become a symbol of the Fairmont’s dedication to the environment and sustainable practices. As part of a 24-month-long renovation, the Fairmont is currently pursuing Leadership for Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) for Building Operations and Maintenance...

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Collective Impact

[vc_row css=".vc_custom_1469033175715{margin-bottom: 20px !important;}" row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left"][vc_column width="1/3"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="18094" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_single_image image="22817" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] By Kiley Jacques [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] Once a defunct naval shipyard, Century Villages of Cabrillo supports a diverse community of once-homeless individuals and families. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="20"][vc_column_text] "On any given night of the year, 1,300 people—either formerly homeless or at risk of becoming homeless—find housing at Century Villages of Cabrillo (CVC) in Long Beach, California. The residents are as diverse as the services available to them. Those who have found their way into the community have discovered a supportive environment where counseling, case management, healthcare, life skills programming, and employment resources are at their disposal. “We really try to surround our residents with all the tools they need to take that next step in their lives, whatever that may be,” says senior vice president of housing for Century Housing, Brian D’Andrea. [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="2/3"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full" image="22828"][vc_column_text]Century Villages of Cabrillo in Long Beach, California, proves housing for 1,300 formerly homeless or at-risk of becoming homeless. Century villages is owned by Century Housing, a community development financial institution. [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" padding_bottom="25" padding_top="20"][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_column_text] Century Housing, a leading community development...

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