This Issue

LEED ON

Engage and Empower

[vc_row][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="24930" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width="1/4"][vc_single_image image="24936" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] Senator Patrick Leahy U.S. Senator of Vermont; Vice Chairman, Senate Appropriations Committee [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="3/4"][vc_column_text] [dropcaps type='normal' color='' background_color='' border_color='']T[/dropcaps]here’s a bumper sticker phrase about Vermont that says, “Vermont: We Were Green Before Green Was Cool.” I’ve always enjoyed that sentiment, that our state has been a leader in environmental responsibility and stewardship, conserving our resources, and the sustainability movement long before it became trendy. Smart, sustainable development relies on effective engagement and empowerment. With Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED), the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) has worked hard to bring people to the table from every stakeholder group, industry, and corner of the economy to help define a common understanding of what it means to build sustainably. This important work is making us stronger, more resilient, and more secure as a nation. In 2003, when the Leahy Center for Lake Champlain opened in Burlington, it was the first LEED-certified building in Vermont. Today the Burlington area is home to more than 75 LEED-certified projects, encompassing more than 3 million gross square feet of space. For a town of 42,000 residents, this constitutes a significant growth...

Read More

Unique Leadership Platforms

[vc_row][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="24595" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width="1/4"][vc_single_image image="24593" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] Taryn Holowka Senior Vice President, Marketing, Communications & Advocacy USGBC [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="3/4"][vc_column_text] [dropcaps type='normal' color='' background_color='' border_color='']W[/dropcaps]hen we set out to develop this issue of USGBC+ we chose the theme: leadership platforms. Each of us has a unique leadership platform—a set of values and beliefs for which we stand. Our platform may be known to others, or it may just be a quiet presence that guides our daily lives. In thinking about leadership, one of the things I’ve always thought of as the definition of a leader is someone who inspires purpose and progress but more importantly, someone who uses their leadership platform to make things better. By that definition, every single member of the USGBC community is a leader. USGBC and its 12,000 member companies, the more than 20 billion sq-ft of LEED projects, the hundreds of committee and community members, the volunteers, the 201,000 LEED Accredited Professionals (APs) and the 25,000 Greenbuild attendees are all inspiring purpose and progress and making things better. Whether it’s creating a new and innovative fixture that saves water, developing alternative materials that are healthier for people, identifying a new strategy...

Read More

Sustainable Win

[vc_row][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="24153" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width="1/4"][vc_single_image image="24157" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] Dave St. Peter President and CEO, Minnesota Twins [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="3/4"][vc_column_text] [dropcaps type='normal' color='' background_color='' border_color='']A[/dropcaps]ustainability doesn’t always come to mind when you think of professional baseball. But with bright lights, open skies, and thousands of fans filling the seats at any given game, the Minnesota Twins recognize the role energy and water efficiency, reduced waste, and sustainability education play in creating the best possible experience for our fans, players, and community. Professional sports franchises have the ability to create local change that can set an example and have a truly global impact when it comes to sustainability initiatives. We don’t take this responsibility lightly. When Target Field opened in 2010, the facility was quickly dubbed “the Greenest Ballpark in America.” Target Field earned Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Silver thanks to many sustainability features integrated into the design and construction of our facility. Never resting on our laurels, the Twins organization then pursued LEED for Existing Buildings to ensure our operations and maintenance practices remained cutting edge and continued to improve. And just a few weeks ago, we were honored when Target Field became the first...

Read More

Committed to Sustainability and Resilience

[vc_row][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="23824" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width="1/4"][vc_single_image image="23822" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] Mayor Kasim Reed Mayor of Atlanta, Georgia [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="3/4"][vc_column_text] [dropcaps type='normal' color='' background_color='' border_color='']A[/dropcaps]tlanta is the most vibrant, culturally significant and international city in the Southeast, the anchor of the ninth-largest metropolitan area in the United States with a population of 5.5 million, centered in the eighth biggest state in the union. We are an emerging global force with a GDP of more than $305 billion. We are also a city committed to innovation and progress, as well as an exporter of culture and change. As a result, Atlanta is emerging as a national and international leader in sustainability and resilience. We recently implemented a special-purpose local option sales tax for transportation to generate approximately $300 million over a five-year period to fund significant and expansive transportation projects citywide. We have conducted several infrastructure improvements under the $250 million Renew Atlanta bond program; hired the first-ever urban agriculture director, who works to bring local, healthy food within a half-mile of 75 percent of all Atlanta residents by year 2020; and adopted an affordable-housing ordinance that reserves a percentage of housing throughout the City for working families. In...

Read More

Partnership Is the New Leadership

[vc_row][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="23482" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width="1/4"][vc_single_image image="23488" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] Mahesh Ramanujam President and CEO USGBC & GBCI [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="3/4"][vc_column_text] [dropcaps type='normal' color='' background_color='' border_color='']E[/dropcaps]very single day, I wake up invigorated by the spirit and strength of the work being done by every member of the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) and the larger green building community around the world that believes in and supports our mission. In my new role as president and CEO of USGBC and Green Business Certification Inc. (GBCI), I’ve pledged to all of you to further enhance our organizational capabilities; bring more people into our global movement; widen our sphere of influence; and to innovate beyond our wildest dreams. USGBC is committed to investing in the future by developing the full potential of the diverse, committed, and passionate people who power our movement. Only by aspiring to organizational excellence and optimum efficiency across our movement will we be able to solve the challenges of tomorrow, writing a new story about people and their stewardship of the built and natural environment. One of the best ways to achieve our lofty goals is to partner with other like-minded individuals, organizations, governments, and businesses to...

Read More

Leading from Within

[vc_row][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="23132" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width="1/4"][vc_single_image image="23134" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] Fulton (Tony) Gale III, FAIA Starbucks Corporate Architect Tony Gale, FAIA, is Starbucks Corporate Architect. He was on the USGBC’s Board of Directors from 2006 to 2009, was Seattle City Architect under mayors Paul Schell and Greg Nickels, and has practiced internationally since 1973 as a principal owner of two award-winning architectural firms. [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="3/4"][vc_column_text] [dropcaps type='normal' color='' background_color='' border_color='']A[/dropcaps]t Starbucks, we’re proud to have been a leader for more than a decade in the development and implementation of a scalable green building program for companies—both retail and beyond. Today we have 1,200 LEED–certified stores in nearly 20 countries and sustainable building has become our standard. I’m proud to have been a founding member of this program and even more proud of the progress we’ve made as an organization. Prior to joining Starbucks, I was Seattle’s city architect from 1999 to 2004 where I led a 20-person team managing the city’s green building policy. I joined Starbucks 11 years ago as corporate architect and found an organization that was passionate about contributing to the communities it serves. Green building and environmental stewardship provide a natural foundation...

Read More

Smart and Sustainable Solutions at the City Scale

[vc_row][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="22800" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width="1/4"][vc_single_image image="22802" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] Mayor Eric Garcetti City of Los Angeles, California [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="3/4"][vc_column_text] [dropcaps type='normal' color='' background_color='' border_color='']W[/dropcaps]hen it comes to sustainability, the bigger the city, the bolder the goal in its scale—but also the more important and influential when achieved. If Los Angeles, a metropolis of 4 million people and 503 square miles, with the third-largest metropolitan GDP on Earth can become sustainable, so can any other city and town. Los Angeles has been a hub of green building activity for many years. As early as 2002, when I first served on the City Council, we became the first big city to require virtually all new municipal buildings to be LEED-certified. In 2009, we raised the minimum standard to LEED Silver. But our most impactful achievement was using the public sector to show that green construction had arrived. As Council president in 2007, I championed legislation to accelerate the greening of L.A.’s private sector buildings. We adopted the city’s first Green Building Program, which required large, new construction or major renovations to meet LEED standards. As our city’s public sector led its private sector on green construction, so the...

Read More

The Future Is Now

[vc_row][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="22404" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width="1/4"][vc_single_image image="22402" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] Shervin Pishevar Co-founder and executive chairman Hyperloop One [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="3/4"][vc_column_text] [dropcaps type='normal' color='' background_color='' border_color='']Y[/dropcaps]ou couldn’t have asked for a more beautiful moment for the future to arrive. The late-day sun dipped behind a range of hills, a breeze was picking up, and out in the Nevada desert—30 miles from the Vegas Strip—I was standing behind a chain-link fence looking at the future of transportation. On the other side of the fence was a 1,500-pound metal sled, a giant aluminum centipede, resting at the start of a 300-meter track. Under the sled and extending down its center for another 57 meters was a thin linear electric motor that, when juiced with power, would shoot the sled down the track. At Hyperloop One, we call this rig the POAT, or propulsion open-air test. Zero to 60 mph in 1.1 seconds, before stopping in a big plume of dust. I was with a couple of site engineers and we whooped, high-fiving all around, and hugged. This was my preview of what the world saw this past May: the first working component of the Hyperloop, Elon Musk’s bold idea for...

Read More

From Green Power to Economic Empowerment

[vc_row][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="22079" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width="1/4"][vc_single_image image="22084" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] Michelle Moore CEO at Groundswell Michelle Moore is CEO of Groundswell, a nonprofit that builds community power to connect low and moderate income communities with clean energy through place-based programs in equitable community solar, affordable wind power, and energy efficiency. A social entrepreneur and former White House official with roots in rural Georgia, Michelle is a relentless agent for change. Her accomplishments range from helping build the global green building movement to leading the sustainability team for the Obama Administration. [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="3/4"][vc_column_text] [dropcaps type='normal' color='' background_color='' border_color='']W[/dropcaps]hat does the sustainability movement look like from the perspective of economic equity? You might measure your response in how much affordable housing is LEED certified, or whether there’s a cost premium for green. But if you’re a family living in poverty paying 10 percent of your total income for dirty power, is the promise of sustainability accessible to you? That’s the question facing an estimated 16 million Americans who are paying more than 10 percent of their household income for electricity. The reality today is that working families pay more to keep the lights on despite falling prices and growing...

Read More

Creating Sustainable Cities

[vc_row][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="21747" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width="1/4"][vc_single_image image="21745" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] Anne Hidalgo Mayor of Paris and Co-host of the Climate Summit for Local Leaders [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][/vc_column][vc_column width="3/4"][vc_column_text] [dropcaps type='normal' color='' background_color='' border_color='']C[/dropcaps]limate change endangers people’s health and poses serious economic threats. Yet by protecting the environment, we not only invest in the future but we also bring immediate public health and economic benefits. By acting boldly to address the perils of climate change, cities can improve millions of lives today—and build a safer, healthier future for the generations to come. Cities around the world are taking the lead in the battle against climate change, and, in doing so, are determining the course of our planet’s future. Cities are more agile than national governments—cities have immediacy in their relationship to the impacts of climate change. They can take bolder actions and can see the benefits of climate action directly. Here in Paris we introduced a Climate Action Plan unanimously approved by the Council of Paris in 2007, updated in 2012, committing our city to decrease its overall emissions by 75 percent in 2050 compared to 2004. In this perspective, Paris implements ambitious programs of construction...

Read More