This Issue

SUSTAINABLE MATERIALS

Open Door Policy

[vc_row][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="22881" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_single_image image="23170" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text]  By Jeff Harder [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] ASSA ABLOY offers a forward-thinking approach to transparency in the marketplace. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="20"][vc_column_text] If the name ASSA ABLOY doesn’t ring a bell, Amy Vigneux wouldn’t be upset. “I always refer to us as the $8 billion company that no one’s heard of,” says Vigneux, ASSA ABLOY’s director of Sustainable Building Solutions, with a laugh. And yet plenty of us have made our acquaintance with the company’s handiwork: We encounter it whenever we walk through Target’s sliding glass doors, or into the Phoenix Convention Center in Arizona, or the Smilow Cancer Hospital in Connecticut. Founded in 1994, the ASSA ABLOY Group has 200 brands—including 22 in North America like Securitron, Sargent, and Corbin Russwin—that design and manufacture doors, frames, mechanical locks and exit devices, decorative hardware, electronic access controls, and “basically anything that goes around a door opening,” Vigneux says. And because door openings have a big impact on the built environment, ASSA ABLOY has put a premium on transparency, going to great lengths to minimize its environmental impact throughout the supply chain and put itself at the forefront of sustainability in...

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Responsible Care

[vc_row][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="22881" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_single_image image="22882" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] By Alexandra Pecci and Amanda Sawit [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] The American Chemistry Council strives to promote safe, sustainable, and responsible supply chains. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="20"][vc_column_text] When Debra Phillips was at her last job at a chemical company, her firm would conduct self-evaluations to keep track of its process, occupational, and environmental safety performance. And while she may have considered that approach to be pretty state of the art in 1996, steady progress over the past 20 years for responsible supply chains sets the stage for continued and accelerated progress over the next 20. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="22883" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_column_text]Right: Debra Phillips, ACC’s vice president of Responsible Care. Photo: Ana L. Ka’ahanui[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" padding_bottom="25"][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_column_text] Now, as the American Chemistry Council’s (ACC) vice president of Responsible Care, Phillips oversees the flagship performance initiative for ACC member companies to promote safe, responsible, and sustainable management of chemicals through their life cycles and for their intended uses. Responsible Care aims to not only keep up with, but also set, the course for the chemical industry related to improving employee safety, environmental protection,...

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Rewriting History

[vc_row][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="18578" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_single_image image="20148" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_column_text] By Alex Wright [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_column_text] [caption id="attachment_20150" align="alignright" width="731"] The Great Pyramids of Giza - the pyramid of Menkaure 215 feet; the great pyramid of Khufu, 481 feet; the Pyramid of Khafre 448 feet. [/caption] How the ancient Egyptians built the pyramids matters to climate change.   Spoiler alert: We may be wrong about how the ancient Egyptians built the Great Pyramids. Decades of schoolchildren are taught the prevailing theory: The pyramids were constructed from enormous blocks of solid stone, cut by hand from far away quarries, and hauled across the searing desert sands. We imagine—thanks in large part to Cecil B. DeMille—thousands of shirtless, sweating slaves harnessed to thick hemp ropes, dragging enormous square blocks of stone up steep ramps. The feat seems so incredible that some wonder whether the Egyptians had help from other planets. Always a rational voice in the room, Neil deGrasse Tyson counters, “Just because you can’t figure out how ancient civilizations built stuff, doesn’t mean they got help from aliens.” Figuring out how the pyramids were built has interesting applications beyond Egyptology. Today’s building materials do not have an expected lifespan anywhere near 4,000 years. And...

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Raising the Bar

[vc_row][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="18578" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_single_image image="18579" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text]By Daniel Overbey A new partnership between the USGBC and UL sheds light on product transparency. [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width="1/1" css=".vc_custom_1424113776341{margin-top: 25px !important;margin-bottom: 25px !important;}"][vc_single_image image="18582" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full" alignment="center"][vc_column_text css=".vc_custom_1424114062714{margin-top: 10px !important;}"]Mikhail Davis, director of restorative enterprise at Interface, explains it was not until the company adopted a life-cycle approach to sustainability that the true impacts of Interface's products could be understood. Photo: Huntsman Architecture[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_column_text] [dropcaps type='normal' color='' background_color='' border_color='']I[/dropcaps]t has been 15 years since the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) launched the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) green building rating system. That first year, 51 projects participated. Today, LEED is the most widely recognized green building program in the world, guiding the design, construction, operations, and maintenance of over 68,000 projects globally. With the emergence of LEED, USGBC’s mission of market transformation took the first steps toward realization. Credits for single-attribute building products featuring recycled content, certified wood, or regional sourcing prompted manufacturers to not just divulge such characteristics about their products, but also to make the information easy to find. Today, manufacturers of building products routinely offer lists of green attributes through convenient resources. As the...

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