This Issue

LEED impact

Learning by Design

[vc_row][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="18094" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_single_image image="23847" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] By Kiley Jacques [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] Green design features add a layer of learning to three acclaimed cultural institutions. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="20"][vc_column_text] Boston Children’s Museum, the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC), and the Barnes Foundation are seemingly disparate projects. A closer look reveals their common thread: Sustainability is the tie. Enhanced visitor experience is the cloth from which all three were cut. Layered together, they begin to form the fabric of future museum design. Boston Children’s Museum Originally located in Jamaica Plain, Boston Children’s Museum moved to its current location in 1979. A recent Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Gold-certified expansion by the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) member Cambridge Seven Associates (C7A) has breathed new life into the dated building, offering diverse educational experiences for a new generation.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="23849" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_column_text]Boston Children’s Museum harvests stormwater from both the green roof and main roof for building services such as irrigation and dual flush toilets. This helps to reduce water runoff into Fort Point Channel by 88 percent and potable water demand and use by 77 percent. Photo: ©...

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Bio Building

[vc_row][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="16705" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_single_image image="23879" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] By Kiley Jacques [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] Biologist and author Janine Benyus shares sustainable, nature-inspired solutions to some of the challenges facing today’s green building professionals. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="20"][vc_column_text] Were it not for biologist Janine Benyus’s keen interest in nature’s systems, the term “biomimicry” may not have been coined. Defined as “an approach to innovation that seeks sustainable solutions to human challenges by emulating nature’s time-tested patterns and strategies,” biomimicry can be applied to any number of situations in the fields of science, architecture, and engineering. [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="23880" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_column_text]Janine Benyus, biologist, author, and founder of consulting firm, Biomimicry 3.8.[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" padding_bottom="25"][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_column_text]A natural history writer, Benyus has published multiple books about the ways in which plants and animals adapt to their habitats. These “ecosystem-first” field guides are intended to help people find nature-inspired solutions to challenges facing the green building industry and beyond. “That adaptation to place always has to do with these amazing technologies,” explains Benyus, citing examples that include UV-resistant animals living in high altitudes and thriving with thin air; and those living at the bottom...

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Smart Park

[vc_row][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="17498" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_single_image image="23896" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] By Mary Grauerholz [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] How parking garages are becoming the newest city parks. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="20"][vc_column_text] Boston has almost 7.5 million square feet of designated, off-street parking space. Wide swaths of concrete, asphalt, and steel, often spattered with oil from vehicles and salt from roadways. The parking facilities in this East Coast city—and across the country—have long been an egregious land-hog. But that is changing. Parksmart, formerly Green Garage Certification, is a relatively new addition to the suite of sustainability rating systems administered by the Green Business Certification Inc. (GBCI) and was developed with the support of the International Parking Institute. Parking facilities are rated on the basis of sustainable practices in management, programming, and technological design. As a result, parking structures now have an opportunity to show communities how they can be more environmentally friendly, by finding innovative ways to reduce energy consumption, maximize performance, and minimize waste.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="23902" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_column_text]Post Office Square is mitigating 100 percent of its electricity footprint with renewable energy under a 25-year Power Purchase Agreement, partnering with MIT and Boston Medical Center, to purchase all...

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Sustainable Lessons

[vc_row][vc_column width="2/3"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="23828" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_single_image image="23827" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] By Jeff Harder [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] The public schools of Lake Mills are becoming high-performance centers of learning. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="20"][vc_column_text] About 35 miles east of Wisconsin’s state capital is Lake Mills—quintessential suburbia with a gazebo-adorned town center, a weekly farmer’s market, and the rural neighborliness of Anytown, USA. But until recently, its Eisenhower-era Prospect Elementary School was an eye-sore in the community: a rambling collection of brick buildings with boarded-up windows, lights casting a headache-inducing yellow, buckets to capture rain pouring through a leaky roof, and mildew growing in storage rooms. “Every classroom I walked into smelled damp and stale,” says Theresa Lehman, a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) AP, a LEED Fellow, LEED faculty member, and director of sustainable services for Wisconsin’s Miron Construction—the firm responsible for building a new school for the community. Bad air quality and poor ventilation led to increases in allergies and absences among students and staff, and lack of daylight and poor acoustics made it a difficult place to teach and learn. [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/3"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="23831" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_column_text]Theresa Lehman, LEED AP, LEED Fellow, LEED faculty member,...

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All the Difference

[vc_row][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="18094" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_single_image image="23491" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] By Kiley Jacques [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] Lava Mae addresses a chronic challenge facing homeless populations. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="20"][vc_column_text] With its mission to “take radical hospitality to the street,” Lava Mae gives people experiencing homelessness access to shower facilities—by making them mobile. Founded in San Francisco in 2014, Lava Mae converts retired city buses into hygiene facilities to deliver showers and “rekindle dignity.” “Homelessness is something that had been on my radar for a while,” says Doniece Sandoval, Lava Mae’s founder and chief executive officer. “It’s an incredibly visible issue in this city.” Sandoval describes her own neighborhood’s gentrification, recalling elderly neighbors who ended up first living in their cars after being evicted, then on the streets—“gentlemen in their 80s, so unprepared for that kind of life. No one is prepared for [that].” She watched as they suffered their circumstances, and she tried, impossibly, to explain their situation to her then-five-year-old daughter. That marked the start of what would become her true life’s work. [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="23493" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_column_text]Doniece Sandoval, Lava Mae’s founder and chief executive officer, with regional director Paul Asplund. Photo: Emily Hagopian[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center"...

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Site Specific Solar

[vc_row][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="16705" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_single_image image="23509" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] By Kiley Jacques [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] Diverse organizations come together to make Yellowstone the nation’s greenest park. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="20"][vc_column_text] Something savvy is happening on the Lamar Buffalo Ranch in Yellowstone National Park—something solar savvy. The coming together of Toyota, Indy Power Systems, Sharp USA, SolarWorld, Patriot Solar, the National Park Service, and Yellowstone Park Foundation has resulted in a first-of-its-kind energy system that repurposes used hybrid car battery packs to store solar power. The stand-alone microgrid provides reliable, sustainable, zero-emission power to the park’s ranger station and education center. [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="23524" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_column_text]Yellowstone’s Strategic Plan for Sustainability sets forth goals for operational and infrastructure improvements that reduce impacts on the environment while enhancing visitor experiences and employee living and working conditions.[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" padding_bottom="25" padding_top="20"][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_column_text]Toyota, a U.S. Green Building Council Platinum level member, was a driving force for the project. The company has enjoyed a long-standing working relationship with the National Park Service and the Yellowstone Park Foundation. For many years, Toyota has supplied hybrid vehicles to support park operations, and has shared green building expertise and...

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Sustainable Equality

[vc_row][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="17498" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_single_image image="23529" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] By Alexandra Deluca [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] Green For All gives disenfranchised communities a voice in sustainability. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="20"][vc_column_text] Like a rising tide that lifts all boats, a truly green economy should be all encompassing, and one Oakland, California, organization has committed to this goal by working at the delta of communities, pollution, and sustainability. [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="23540" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_column_text]Vien Truong leads Green For All, a national initiative to build an inclusive green economy strong enough to lift people out of poverty.[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" padding_bottom="25"][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_column_text]“Our mission is to create an inclusive green economy strong enough to lift people out of poverty,” says Vien Truong, director of the nongovernmental organization Green For All. “We work on solutions at the federal, state, and local levels. A lot of work that we do is not only on policy but it’s also on politics and really engaging people.” “We want to make sure that we’re doing it in ways that are really inclusive of people who are at the bottom tiers and really making sure they’re engaged in the change of the community. By...

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Redefining Sites

[vc_row][vc_column width="1/3"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="16705" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_single_image image="23187" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] By Kiley Jacques [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] By elevating the value of landscapes to include ecological and social benefits, the SITES Rating System promotes sustainable design and resiliency on the University of Texas at El Paso campus. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="20"][/vc_column][vc_column width="2/3"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="23193" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_column_text]The Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower center wetland pond is home to native Texas aquatic plants and animals, featuring plants that can only grow in water or soil that is permanently saturated with water. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" padding_bottom="25"][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_column_text] Uniquely situated at the U.S.–Mexico border, the University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) serves over 23,000 students per year. It also figures prominently in the greater Paso del Norte community. So when the decision was made to transform the asphalt-laden, car-centric core of the campus into an inviting living landscape, both communities benefitted. As prime consultant on UTEP’s Campus Transformation Project (CTP), Ten Eyck Landscape Architects Inc. set out to strengthen the connection between the city, the campus, and the land. Project principal Christine Ten Eyck explains the design concept in terms of the school’s location: “The campus sits...

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Open Door Policy

[vc_row][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="22881" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_single_image image="23170" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text]  By Jeff Harder [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] ASSA ABLOY offers a forward-thinking approach to transparency in the marketplace. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="20"][vc_column_text] If the name ASSA ABLOY doesn’t ring a bell, Amy Vigneux wouldn’t be upset. “I always refer to us as the $8 billion company that no one’s heard of,” says Vigneux, ASSA ABLOY’s director of Sustainable Building Solutions, with a laugh. And yet plenty of us have made our acquaintance with the company’s handiwork: We encounter it whenever we walk through Target’s sliding glass doors, or into the Phoenix Convention Center in Arizona, or the Smilow Cancer Hospital in Connecticut. Founded in 1994, the ASSA ABLOY Group has 200 brands—including 22 in North America like Securitron, Sargent, and Corbin Russwin—that design and manufacture doors, frames, mechanical locks and exit devices, decorative hardware, electronic access controls, and “basically anything that goes around a door opening,” Vigneux says. And because door openings have a big impact on the built environment, ASSA ABLOY has put a premium on transparency, going to great lengths to minimize its environmental impact throughout the supply chain and put itself at the forefront of sustainability in...

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Healthy Hospital

[vc_row][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="18059" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_single_image image="23157" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] By Mary Grauerholz [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] Inova Heath System is on the forefront of greening the nation’s hospitals. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="20"][vc_column_text] When Seema Wadhwa became the assistant vice president of Sustainability and Wellness at Inova Health System, Inova’s management team clearly had sustainability on its roadmap, leadership just didn’t know the best way to get the organization to the destination. At a time when the healthcare industry was beginning to dip its toes into sustainability, Wadhwa, a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED)–accredited professional, embraced the challenge. [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="23160" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_column_text]Seema Wadhwa is assistant vice president of Sustainability and Wellness at Inova Health System.[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" padding_bottom="25"][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_column_text]“Inova wanted to move toward sustainability, but didn’t know what it looked like,” Wadhwa recalls. Today, Inova shows how greening a healthcare setting can reap success. The health network serves more than 2 million people in northern Virginia and the Washington, D.C., metro area with five hospitals and numerous other facilities, including the area’s only Level 1 trauma center and Level IV neonatal intensive care unit. Inova hospitals hold 18 Joint...

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