This Issue

LEED impact

Green Backing

[vc_row][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="18094" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_single_image image="24940" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text]  By Kiley Jacques [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] Architect, policy maker, and green school champion Joseph da Silva advocates for integration and collaboration on every front. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="20"][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="24944" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_column_text]Joseph da Silva has been on the forefront of the green schools movement in New England.[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_column_text] Joseph da Silva, Ph.D., has a unique perspective when it comes to school buildings. The first-generation immigrant was born in the Azores, Portugal, which he describes as “an environmental paradise.” Upon moving to the United States as a young boy, he entered the public school system, where he became distinctly aware of his surroundings. “I really connected with the space of the classroom because it was so foreign to anything I had ever experienced,” he recalls. “I was exposed to the fact that schools have all of these unique spaces. They have auditoriums, theaters, offices, classrooms, and athletic facilities—all together in one place. That was fascinating to me. That was when I started really focusing on architecture and school buildings.” That formative time set him on a path from which he has never strayed. He earned...

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Taking Flight

[vc_row][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="16705" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_single_image image="24964" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text]  By Kiley Jacques [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] Liberty Wildlife Rehabilitation Center makes significant strides in its conservation and education efforts using its new LEED Platinum building as a vehicle. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="20"][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="24967" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_column_text]Liberty Wildlife has been a leader in rescue, rehabilitation, education, and conservation throughout Arizona since 1981.[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_column_text] Located on the banks of the Rio Salado River in Phoenix, Arizona, the Liberty Wildlife Rehabilitation Center uses its site and new green home to advance its work. Incorporated in 1981 by founder Dr. Kathryn Orr, a veterinarian and expert ornithologist, the nonprofit’s mission is to nurture the nature of Arizona by providing quality wildlife rehabilitation, environmental education, and conservation services. The award-winning, volunteer-driven organization uses raptors that have been deemed nonreleasable to evidence the importance of protecting wildlife species and their habitats. “We can take the face of an animal and use it to demonstrate why the use of sustainable practices is so vital to whatever you are doing,” says Executive Director Megan Mosby. The Center’s location—a former brownfield now comprising upper Sonoran desert, riparian, and wetland biomes—is key...

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From Steel to Silver and Gold

[vc_row][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="17498" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_single_image image="24983" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] By Jeff Harder [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] A spotlight on the first LEED-certified steel production mill in the world. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="20"][vc_column_text] The Arkansas Delta conjures the backdrop of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, and the town of Osceola is the region’s quintessential landscape: soybean and cotton fields, the churn of the Lower Mississippi River beyond the levees, and wide-open miles between glimpses of one small town and the next. The area, about an hour north of Memphis, has also fallen on hard times, with declining population and high unemployment. But on 1,300 acres between the Mississippi and BNSF Railway train tracks, an Osceola steel maker is changing fortunes by turning a soot-stained industry a new shade of green. Last February, the Big River Steel Production Facility became the world’s first steel mill to achieve the U.S. Green Building Council’s (USGBC) Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification. The $1.3 billion, four-building facility has also been a true economic engine for eastern Arkansas, bringing more than 500 full-time jobs paying good salaries. And for an industry traditionally considered at odds with the environment, Big River Steel augurs a new...

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Campus Crusaders

[vc_row][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="18094" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_single_image image="24602" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text]  By Kiley Jacques [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] Student participation in LEED Lab has far-reaching impacts—from the classroom to the community to the consciousness of tomorrow’s green industry leaders. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="20"][vc_column_text] Sustainability at institutions of higher learning is increasingly evident around the globe, and USGBC’s LEED Lab has played a significant role in that achievement. The interactive, multidisciplinary immersion course is designed to transform the academic environment to prepare students for 21st-century careers in sustainability. [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="24611" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_column_text]UC Merced has set a goal to attain LEED certification for all of its buildings.[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_column_text] Sustainability at institutions of higher learning is increasingly evident around the globe, and USGBC’s LEED Lab has played a significant role in that achievement. The interactive, multidisciplinary immersion course is designed to transform the academic environment to prepare students for 21st-century careers in sustainability. In the course, students learn the principles of LEED and receive actual project experience by assessing the performance of existing facilities on their campus, facilitating the complete LEED Operations and Maintenance (O+M) process with the goal of achieving certification. LEED O+M ensures that the building...

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Collaborative Thinking

[vc_row][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="17498" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_single_image image="24641" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text]  By Alexandra Pecci [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] Lendlease strives to bring innovative ideas to life. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="20"][vc_column_text] When it comes to recycling, wallboard isn’t easy stuff to handle. It’s incredibly sensitive, losing its recyclability when it breaks into crumbs or powder, or even when it’s mixed with other waste. As a result, it often falls by the wayside in recycling efforts. But Geoffrey Brock, LEED AP BD+C, ID+C, ND, sustainability director at the global construction and property firm Lendlease, was eager to change that. After all, he points out, wallboard makes up 20 percent of construction waste, and can actually make up the majority of waste for interior projects. [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="24643" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_column_text]Lendlease created an innovation program in 2016 to gather ideas from all facets of the company. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" padding_top="20"][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_column_text] “We’re talking the magnitude of hundreds of tons of waste,” he says. “It means something more than just recycling at the office.” Despite the imperative, the desire, and the important idea, he had trouble getting a wallboard recycling initiative off the ground. “I was not very successful because I was...

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Efficient Data

[vc_row][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="21415" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_single_image image="24664" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text]  By Lorne Bell [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] Data centers power our digital lives, using immense amounts of energy to connect people and information around the world. Now, LEED is helping the world’s top data companies find new paths to energy efficiency. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="20"][vc_column_text] If you’ve ever left a running laptop on a surface for too long, you know the kind of heat that it can generate. Now imagine that amount of heat magnified by ceiling-high server towers that fill buildings the size of football fields. Data centers are designed to run 24 hours a day, every day of the year. Powering and cooling these information hubs requires massive amounts of energy—consider that one data center can use as much energy as a small town. Cumulatively, data centers across the U.S. used 70 billion kWh of electricity in 2014, according to Lawrence Berkeley National Lab’s Data Center Energy Usage Report. That’s about 2 percent of the nation’s electricity, the same amount used by some 6.4 million U.S. homes.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="24666" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_column_text]DPR’s Prineville, Oregon, data center for Facebook is one of the most energy efficient...

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On the Home Front

[vc_row][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="18094" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_single_image image="24161" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text]  By Alexandra Pecci [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] USGBC’s Green Home Guide website offers homeowners sound advice for better living. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="20"][vc_column_text] After installing high-efficiency appliances and lighting during renovations of her Eichler home, Elizabeth Milne, a lawyer from Palo Alto, California, was shocked to see her electricity bill actually go up. The culprit? A newly installed instant hot water heater on the sink that immediately provided boiling water—but that also relied on an always-running heating coil that kept the water at a high temperature 24 hours a day. “I just unplugged it and my utility bill went down,” she says. [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="24165" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_column_text]Private Allentown residence pool garden. William Dohe, AIA, LEED AP, Project Architect. Photo: Alyssha Eve Csuk[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" padding_bottom="25" padding_top="20"][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_column_text] Like many, Milne is on a journey to green her home. In addition to installing better appliances, she also repainted the walls with low-VOC paint and replaced the kitchen backsplash with tiles made from recycled glass. But she wants to do more—on a reasonable budget—and has questions about things like graywater reuse, the most environmentally friendly furniture, the...

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Growing Detroit

[vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left"][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="16705" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_single_image image="24195" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] By Kiley Jacques [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] Motor City is poised to become the epicenter of urban agriculture. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="20"][vc_column_text] It’s no secret Detroit has suffered. The postindustrial city’s economic and demographic downturn has left it in a compromised state for decades. But in a two-square-block area of its North End, change is afoot. In 2011, the Michigan Urban Farming Initiative (MUFI), an all-volunteer nonprofit organization, purchased a defunct apartment complex at auction. And ever since, MUFI president and co-founder, Tyson Gersh, has been building something altogether new—the nation’s first urban “agrihood.” [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="24200" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_column_text]7432 Brush Street is a distressed property in Detroit that was purchased by MUFI in October 2011. It was built in 1915 and used continuously until circa 2009. The goal is to restore the structure to a community resource center that will help foster sustainability and urban renewal.[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" padding_bottom="25"][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_column_text] There are about 200 agrihood models currently operating in rural and suburban areas around the country, but this is the first infill-style model. “To take it a degree further,” says Gersh,...

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Investing in the Green Economy

[vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left"][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="17498" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_single_image image="24233" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] By Calvin Hennick [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] Responding to the risks posed by climate change is no longer reserved for socially responsible companies. There is now a clear priority for all businesses that want a prosperous future. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="20"][vc_column_text] A car in the 1970s traveled, on average, fewer than 15 miles on a gallon of gasoline. Today, that number is pushing 35. Around a decade ago, solar power was still largely seen as a niche energy source, reserved for organizations that were either exceptionally enthusiastic about sustainability or the recipients of large subsidies. Today, utilities are leading investment in solar with a doubling of U.S. large-scale solar projects to about nine gigawatts in 2016, while suburbanites are topping their roofs with solar panels, slashing their energy bills and even sometimes selling some back to the grid. [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="24235" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_column_text]A solar panel is produced at SolarWorld, America’s largest manufacturer of solar panels.[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" padding_bottom="25"][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_column_text] What changed? The marketplace. Over time, gasoline became more expensive, and the cost of solar panels came down quite a bit. In...

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Learning by Design

[vc_row][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="18094" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_single_image image="23847" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] By Kiley Jacques [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] Green design features add a layer of learning to three acclaimed cultural institutions. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="20"][vc_column_text] Boston Children’s Museum, the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC), and the Barnes Foundation are seemingly disparate projects. A closer look reveals their common thread: Sustainability is the tie. Enhanced visitor experience is the cloth from which all three were cut. Layered together, they begin to form the fabric of future museum design. Boston Children’s Museum Originally located in Jamaica Plain, Boston Children’s Museum moved to its current location in 1979. A recent Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Gold-certified expansion by the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) member Cambridge Seven Associates (C7A) has breathed new life into the dated building, offering diverse educational experiences for a new generation.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="23849" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_column_text]Boston Children’s Museum harvests stormwater from both the green roof and main roof for building services such as irrigation and dual flush toilets. This helps to reduce water runoff into Fort Point Channel by 88 percent and potable water demand and use by 77 percent. Photo: ©...

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