This Issue

ecosystems

LEED+

[vc_row][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="16705" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_single_image image="25285" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text]  By Mary Grauerholz [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] Projects implementing LEED are poised to leverage the shared advantages of complementary rating systems. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="20"][vc_column_text] Big sustainability projects often begin with big dreams. Visionaries John Schmid, CEO of Propark America and the developer of Canopy Airport Parking in Denver, and Richard Piacentini, executive director of Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens in Pittsburgh, both recall the moment they crystallized remarkable concepts to save the Earth’s resources. Schmid set his mind to constructing a parking facility that would elevate energy efficiency to a lofty new level. Piacentini and his board, using a master planning process, began with the U.S. Green Building Council’s (USGBC) Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) green building rating system and then folded in other sustainability certifications for a robust solution. [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="25288" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_column_text]Phipps Welcome Center, opened in 2005, was the first LEED-certified visitor center in a public garden in the world. Photo: Denmarsh Photography, Inc[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_column_text] As Schmid recalls, “We set out to build the most sustainable parking facility on the planet. Two years later, we welcomed a baby called...

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Taking Flight

[vc_row row_type="row" type="grid" text_align="left"][vc_column width="1/1"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="16705" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_single_image image="24964" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text]  By Kiley Jacques [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] Liberty Wildlife Rehabilitation Center makes significant strides in its conservation and education efforts using its new LEED Platinum building as a vehicle. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="20"][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="24967" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_column_text]Liberty Wildlife has been a leader in rescue, rehabilitation, education, and conservation throughout Arizona since 1981.[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="20"][vc_column_text] Located on the banks of the Rio Salado River in Phoenix, Arizona, the Liberty Wildlife Rehabilitation Center uses its site and new green home to advance its work. Incorporated in 1981 by founder Dr. Kathryn Orr, a veterinarian and expert ornithologist, the nonprofit’s mission is to nurture the nature of Arizona by providing quality wildlife rehabilitation, environmental education, and conservation services. The award-winning, volunteer-driven organization uses raptors that have been deemed nonreleasable to evidence the importance of protecting wildlife species and their habitats. “We can take the face of an animal and use it to demonstrate why the use of sustainable practices is so vital to whatever you are doing,” says Executive Director Megan Mosby. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="20"][mgl_tubelab_video mode="embed" template="default" display="title" size="high"...

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Growing Detroit

[vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left"][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="16705" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_single_image image="24195" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] By Kiley Jacques [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] Motor City is poised to become the epicenter of urban agriculture. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="20"][vc_column_text] It’s no secret Detroit has suffered. The postindustrial city’s economic and demographic downturn has left it in a compromised state for decades. But in a two-square-block area of its North End, change is afoot. In 2011, the Michigan Urban Farming Initiative (MUFI), an all-volunteer nonprofit organization, purchased a defunct apartment complex at auction. And ever since, MUFI president and co-founder, Tyson Gersh, has been building something altogether new—the nation’s first urban “agrihood.” [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="24200" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_column_text]7432 Brush Street is a distressed property in Detroit that was purchased by MUFI in October 2011. It was built in 1915 and used continuously until circa 2009. The goal is to restore the structure to a community resource center that will help foster sustainability and urban renewal.[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" padding_bottom="25"][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_column_text] There are about 200 agrihood models currently operating in rural and suburban areas around the country, but this is the first infill-style model. “To take it a degree further,” says Gersh,...

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Bio Building

[vc_row][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="16705" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_single_image image="23879" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] By Kiley Jacques [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] Biologist and author Janine Benyus shares sustainable, nature-inspired solutions to some of the challenges facing today’s green building professionals. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="20"][vc_column_text] Were it not for biologist Janine Benyus’s keen interest in nature’s systems, the term “biomimicry” may not have been coined. Defined as “an approach to innovation that seeks sustainable solutions to human challenges by emulating nature’s time-tested patterns and strategies,” biomimicry can be applied to any number of situations in the fields of science, architecture, and engineering. [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="23880" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_column_text]Janine Benyus, biologist, author, and founder of consulting firm, Biomimicry 3.8.[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" padding_bottom="25"][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_column_text]A natural history writer, Benyus has published multiple books about the ways in which plants and animals adapt to their habitats. These “ecosystem-first” field guides are intended to help people find nature-inspired solutions to challenges facing the green building industry and beyond. “That adaptation to place always has to do with these amazing technologies,” explains Benyus, citing examples that include UV-resistant animals living in high altitudes and thriving with thin air; and those living at the bottom...

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Site Specific Solar

[vc_row][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="16705" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_single_image image="23509" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] By Kiley Jacques [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] Diverse organizations come together to make Yellowstone the nation’s greenest park. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="20"][vc_column_text] Something savvy is happening on the Lamar Buffalo Ranch in Yellowstone National Park—something solar savvy. The coming together of Toyota, Indy Power Systems, Sharp USA, SolarWorld, Patriot Solar, the National Park Service, and Yellowstone Park Foundation has resulted in a first-of-its-kind energy system that repurposes used hybrid car battery packs to store solar power. The stand-alone microgrid provides reliable, sustainable, zero-emission power to the park’s ranger station and education center. [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="23524" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_column_text]Yellowstone’s Strategic Plan for Sustainability sets forth goals for operational and infrastructure improvements that reduce impacts on the environment while enhancing visitor experiences and employee living and working conditions.[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" padding_bottom="25" padding_top="20"][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_column_text]Toyota, a U.S. Green Building Council Platinum level member, was a driving force for the project. The company has enjoyed a long-standing working relationship with the National Park Service and the Yellowstone Park Foundation. For many years, Toyota has supplied hybrid vehicles to support park operations, and has shared green building expertise and...

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Redefining Sites

[vc_row][vc_column width="1/3"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="16705" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_single_image image="23187" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] By Kiley Jacques [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] By elevating the value of landscapes to include ecological and social benefits, the SITES Rating System promotes sustainable design and resiliency on the University of Texas at El Paso campus. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="20"][/vc_column][vc_column width="2/3"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="23193" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_column_text]The Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower center wetland pond is home to native Texas aquatic plants and animals, featuring plants that can only grow in water or soil that is permanently saturated with water. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" padding_bottom="25"][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_column_text] Uniquely situated at the U.S.–Mexico border, the University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) serves over 23,000 students per year. It also figures prominently in the greater Paso del Norte community. So when the decision was made to transform the asphalt-laden, car-centric core of the campus into an inviting living landscape, both communities benefitted. As prime consultant on UTEP’s Campus Transformation Project (CTP), Ten Eyck Landscape Architects Inc. set out to strengthen the connection between the city, the campus, and the land. Project principal Christine Ten Eyck explains the design concept in terms of the school’s location: “The campus sits...

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A Lasting Memory

[vc_row][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="16705" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_single_image image="22861" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] By Calvin Hennick [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] The memorial park at the United Airlines Flight 93 crash site incorporates sustainable building elements in a natural setting. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="20"][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="22863" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_column_text]The Flight 93 National Memorial’s concrete walls follow the path the plane took on 9/11. Photo: Eric Staudenmaier Photography and Paul Murdoch Architects.[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" padding_bottom="25"][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_column_text] The grief and the memories hit people in different ways when they visit the Flight 93 National Memorial. For many, the focal point is the 17-ton sandstone boulder that marks the site where the wreckage of United Airlines Flight 93 smoldered 15 years ago. Others get chills as they walk along the Wall of Names—composed of 40 individual slabs of white marble, each inscribed with the name of a crew member or passenger who died in the attack—and realize that they are traversing the jet’s final flight path. For some, a gentle breeze and a ray of sunshine are enough to transport them back to that early fall day in 2001, when planes across the country were grounded and the calm...

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Sea Change

[vc_row css=".vc_custom_1469033175715{margin-bottom: 20px !important;}" row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left"][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="16705" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_single_image image="22429" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] By Kiley Jacques [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] The Surfrider Foundation broadens its efforts to protect ocean waters by including residential landscape management. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="20"][vc_column_text] "Some of the best times to go surfing are when it’s raining, and we are told by the government to stay out of the water for 72 hours after a rain event—so you have to strike a balance between getting sick and taking advantage of great waves,” says Paul Herzog, an avid surfer and Ocean Friendly Gardens (OFG) program coordinator for the Surfrider Foundation. The foundation’s Clean Water Initiative is devoted to protecting 100 percent of U.S. coastlines over the next five years. Through these programs, of which OFG is one, they keep hundreds of millions of gallons of polluted water from entering oceans and waterways daily. The Surfrider Foundation introduced OFG seven years ago with the idea of giving its members a way to make a difference while waiting for government policies to change. “We had seen water quality problems persist, and while we worked at multiple levels—advocacy, programming, projects—we wanted to give our members a kind...

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Cleaner, Faster, Friendlier

[vc_row][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="16705" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_single_image image="22120" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text]  By Katharine Logan [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] Brownfield remediation’s third generation comes of age. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="20"][vc_column_text] Brownfield cleanup, long a quagmire of cost and uncertainty, is undergoing a paradigm shift. As regulatory agencies put away their big sticks and facilitate collaborative, market-driven solutions instead, brownfield redevelopment is emerging as cleanup’s main driver. “What we’re seeing is the maturing of a third generation in brownfield remediation,” says James Maul, president of Maul Foster & Alongi, a consulting firm integrating environmental engineering with planning and community development. [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="22121" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_column_text]Brownfield development is providing opportunities for the city of Portland, Oregon.[/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" padding_bottom="25" padding_top="15"][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_column_text] In brownfields’ first generation, regulatory agencies drove cleanup for cleanup’s sake, with no consideration for economic or community context. In the second generation, elements of proposed redevelopments crept in for cost savings: pathways or building foundations, for example, might form part of the cap on a contaminated site. In the third generation, the most polluted sites have been dealt with, and most of the thousands of brownfields that remain will never rise to the top of the environmental...

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Sustainable Sips

[vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" padding_top="25"][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_single_image image="16705" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_single_image image="21782" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_column_text] By Kiley Jacques [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] Sonoma County’s wine region is on the verge of a new identity—the first of its kind. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] Two years ago, Sonoma County Winegrowers (SCW) put forth a comprehensive sustainability initiative—one that aims to position the county as the nation’s first completely sustainable wine region. The county’s wine industry has always been a forerunner when it comes to sustainable farming. This latest move is a prime example of regional winegrowers’ efforts to ensure agriculture remains the vanguard of the local economy. A 100-year business plan—thought to be the first of its kind in the global wine industry—outlines the ways in which they will protect agriculture into the 22nd century.   [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_single_image image="21787" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_column_text css=".vc_custom_1458324637593{margin-bottom: 20px !important;}"] Karissa Kruse is the president of the Sonoma County Winegrowers. [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" padding_bottom="25"][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_column_text]Originally known as the Sonoma County Grape Growers association, SCW pushed for commission status in 2006. At that time, 1,800 growers voted to impose a self-assessment on the sale of their grapes, which meant that any vineyard in Sonoma County selling 25 tons or more would pay half of 1 percent...

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