green economy

[vc_row][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="17498" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_single_image image="24641" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text]  By Alexandra Pecci [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] Lendlease strives to bring innovative ideas to life. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="20"][vc_column_text] When it comes to recycling, wallboard isn’t easy stuff to handle. It’s incredibly sensitive, losing its recyclability when it breaks into crumbs or powder, or even when it’s mixed with other waste. As a result, it often falls by the wayside in recycling efforts. But Geoffrey Brock, LEED AP BD+C, ID+C, ND, sustainability director at the global construction and property firm Lendlease, was eager to change that. After all, he points out, wallboard makes up 20 percent of construction waste, and can actually make up the majority of waste for interior projects. [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="24643" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_column_text]Lendlease created an innovation program in 2016 to gather ideas from all facets of the company. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row row_type="row" type="full_width" text_align="left" padding_top="20"][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_column_text] “We’re talking the magnitude of hundreds of tons of waste,” he says. “It means something more than just recycling at the office.” Despite the imperative, the desire, and the important idea, he had trouble getting a wallboard recycling initiative off the ground. “I was not very successful because I was...

[vc_row][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="21415" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_single_image image="24664" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text]  By Lorne Bell [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_column_text] Data centers power our digital lives, using immense amounts of energy to connect people and information around the world. Now, LEED is helping the world’s top data companies find new paths to energy efficiency. [/vc_column_text][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="20"][vc_column_text] If you’ve ever left a running laptop on a surface for too long, you know the kind of heat that it can generate. Now imagine that amount of heat magnified by ceiling-high server towers that fill buildings the size of football fields. Data centers are designed to run 24 hours a day, every day of the year. Powering and cooling these information hubs requires massive amounts of energy—consider that one data center can use as much energy as a small town. Cumulatively, data centers across the U.S. used 70 billion kWh of electricity in 2014, according to Lawrence Berkeley National Lab’s Data Center Energy Usage Report. That’s about 2 percent of the nation’s electricity, the same amount used by some 6.4 million U.S. homes.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_separator type="transparent" position="center" up="30"][vc_single_image image="24666" border_color="grey" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_column_text]DPR’s Prineville, Oregon, data center for Facebook is one of the most energy efficient...